Announcement: 31 Days Of Oscar Blogathon 2019

Announcement: 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon 2019

joan-crawford-oscars-speech-video

From the time Douglas Fairbanks, then President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, hosted the first Awards dinner party for about 250 people on May 16, 1929, to this year’s host-free Oscars ceremony ninety years later, this iconic celebration honoring Hollywood’s finest continues to be just as spectacular and riddled with excellence and contentions as the films and filmmakers they honor.

31-days-2019-banner

If you take a look back at the many Oscar moments in these past 90 years of Oscars ceremonies, you’ll find numerous surprises, disappointments and controversies, which continue to spark debate to this day. That’s where we come in. For the seventh consecutive year, I am joining forces with Aurora of Once Upon A Screen aka @CitizenScreen and Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club aka @Paula_Guthat to bring you the 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon. We hope you’ll consider joining us to make this the best and brightest Oscar blogging event yet.

Not surprising, this blogging event is inspired by Turner Classic Movies’ 31 Days of Oscar marathon, which begins its 24th installment on February 1 and ends March 3rd. This year the network presents the film schedule in a mixed topics potpourri surrounding the historic film industry. Topics range from “Grittiest Streets of New York” to “Favorite Singing Cowboys” to “Favorite Epic Soap Opera.” As the Oscars themselves, there’s something for everyone. See the full schedule here: http://prod-images.tcm.com/Microsites/31Days/31Days2019-Schedule.pdf

Since both TCM and the Oscars bring to mind our beloved host and favorite historian, Robert Osborne, we thought we would kick off our Blogathon with his words about the 31 Days of Oscar marathon…

“One thing seems to stir the souls of our Turner Classic Movie loyalists like no other: the 31 Days of Oscar salute.” 

Blogathon Details

This year, we will host all the contributing entries the weekend of the Oscars. That is from Friday, February 22nd through Sunday, February 24th, wrapping up just in the nick of time to watch the Oscars ceremony. We’re also combining all topics this year and simply presenting them over the three days. Any Oscar-related topic is fair game. We are not limiting this event to classic film fare as we’d like to see entries covering the entire span of 9 decades history of Oscar, including this year’s nominees. To help get you motivated, here are categories we have used in the past…

  • The Actors
  • The Directors
  • The Motion Pictures
  • Oscar Snubs
  • The Crafts (music, costumes, etc.)
  • New Idea – Oscar Controversies

Most of you know the drill, but as a reminder, adhering to the following is necessary:

  • Let us know what your desired topic is by leaving a comment on any of the host blogs
  • Include the title and link to your blog in the comments area
  • Advise if you have a date preference – Friday 2/22, Saturday 2/23 or Sunday 2/24
  • Include the event banner on your blog and in the entry post to help us promote the event

Restrictions – just two:

  • Please do not submit previously published posts
  • No duplicates will be accepted to ensure we cover as much of Oscar history as possible

We look forward to hearing from you and to reading your entries. As many entries as you want, actually, so get to it!

Until then here’s to Oscar, to TCM and to YOU! Happy Blogging!

Participating Blogs and Topics:

Caftan Woman… Irving Berlin at the Oscars

Once Upon A Screen… Interview with Kimberly Truhler- Fashion and Oscar

The Stop Button… Eleanor Parker: Oscar Nominee

Movie Night’s Group… Peter O’Toole in My Favorite Year

The Old Hollywood Garden… Best Supporting Actress of 1952 (1953 Oscars ceremony)

Outspoken & Freckled… Bizarre and Beautiful at the Biltmore: the 7th Academy Awards

 

Day One: 7th annual WHAT A CHARACTER! BLOGATHON

IMG_7735

Today we bring you the first day of the 7th annual WHAT A CHARACTER! BLOGATHON, hosted by yours truly and my fellow co-hosts, the classic film loving ladies: Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club @Paula_Guthat and Aurora of Once Upon A Screen @CitizenScreen.

As promised, this annual event celebrates the character actors. Those unsung heroes of the silver screen, those familiar faces who often steal every scene from the leads… we salute you! Whether it’s the frustrated hotel manager, or sharp-witted maids, perhaps a sassy sidekick, or even the best friend… in so many ways, the character role is often our favorite, albeit small, performances of a film. We have invited bloggers to scribe on their favorite characters. Here they are!

IMG_7736

Gill of Reelweedgiemidget Reviews @realweegiemidge discusses the usually second- billing, yet always first-rate performances of Engaging Roles from Enigmatic ED HARRIS Read about it here: https://weegiemidget.wordpress.com/starring/actors-2/ed-harris/ 

Screen Shot 2018-12-14 at 1.42.55 PM

Maddy of Maddy Loves Her Classic Films presents SARA ALLGOOD. As Maddy affectionately adds, “She truly was one of the most gifted and natural actresses of the classic film era.” Read more: https://maddylovesherclassicfilms.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/the-seventh-annual-what-a-character-blogathon-sara-allgood/

jacklambert5

Paddy of the Caftan Woman @CaftanWoman scribes on The Villainy of JACK LAMBERT. She describes him, “His craggy face and intimidating physique made Lambert a tough guy walking.” Read all the details on memorable character: https://www.caftanwoman.com/2018/12/what-character-blogathon-villainy-of.html

Actor Nat Pendleton

Sarah of the Mrs. Charles blog scribes on NAT PENDLETON. Sarah explains how she came to know a great deal about this prolific character actor who was much more than just “a likeable, but not too bright policeman, gangster, assistant…” Learn more here: https://mrscharlesonline.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/nat-pendleton/

6

Jacqueline of Another Old Movie Blog offers her thoughts on WALTER ABEL. As she writes, “He was worthy of lead roles, but he was one of those actors who managed to turn even a small character part into the lead for even just a few moments.” Find out more here: https://anotheroldmovieblog.blogspot.com/2018/12/walter-abel.html?fbclid=IwAR04JcaUXcv9VSoMrWNz2yYKSINLBaC8siSW5g0cEz2VfXf5VCxJpmvDr6I

Screen Shot 2018-11-04 at 10.14.49 AM

One Gal’s Musings presents, JEAN DIXON. As she describes this scene-stealer, “Jean Dixon was once Hollywood’s Everywoman.” Read more on this relateable character: https://onegalsmusings.blogspot.com/2018/12/what-character-jean-dixon.html

stephen-mcnally-i

Theresa of CineMaven’s Essays From The Couch joins us. She reached her choice of character actor as she explains, “And who better to dive into but the tall, dark, ruggedly handsome and oh so dangerous… STEPHEN MCNALLY.” When he’s bad, he’s good! We agree, Theresa! Read on, friends: https://cinemavensessaysfromthecouch.wordpress.com/2018/12/14/stephen-mcnally-when-hes-bad-hes-good/

blogwac1

Quiggy from The Midnite Drive-In saddles up with a tribute to a frequent John Wayne cowpoke, HANK WORDEN. As Quiggy adds, “And I’d hazard a guess that if you thought of minor characters in Wayne movies, at least one or two in the top 10 would be a character played by Worden.  Some of them were quite memorable.” More: https://midnitedrive-in.blogspot.com/2018/12/hank-worden-and-john-wayne.html

Keen-Bond2

Next up, Constance of Silver Scenes pays tribute to GEOFFREY KEEN – The Minister From England. As she notes, “He cut an imposing figure, was always well-groomed and cultured ( you’d never catch Keen among lowly people ), and walked in an air of authority.” Read on here:  https://silverscenesblog.blogspot.com/2018/12/geoffrey-keen-minister-from-england.html

Skelton2

Last but not least, Bill Shaffer as guest blogger on Outspoken & Freckled offers up the distinctively familiar face of SKELTON KNAGGS. As Bill observes, “One look at that face and hearing that voice like a rasping knife and he’s pretty hard to forget.” Discover more about this character with a lesser known name and better known face: https://kelleepratt.com/2018/12/15/skelton-knaggs/

Thanks so much to all of our talented participants (who allow me to learn new and interesting details about characters every time we host this) and big kudos to my fellow co-hosts Paula and Aurora! Be sure to read all of these fascinating entries to our blogathon all weekend long..

Day 2: Once Upon A Screen

Day 3: Paula’s Cinema Club

WAC2018-1

Announcing the 7th Annual WHAT A CHARACTER! BLOGATHON

Announcing the SEVENTH ANNUAL What A Character! Blogathon
December 14-16, 2018

GoldDiggersOf193324-650x493When you re-watch your favorite films, what keeps you coming back for more? A great story with sharp writing? No doubt. Beautiful costumes, swanky set designs, and stunning cinematography? Most assuredly. But the performances are key to any movie. While we all look forward to the popular leading actors, it is the stand-out, scene-stealing supporting actors that feel like “home.”

Wise-cracking Eve Arden, nurturing Louise Beavers, sassy Thelma Ritter, double-take pro Edward Everett Horton, tart-tongued Edna May Oliver, gravelly-voiced Eddie “Rochester” Anderson, fatherly Charles Coburn, frazzled Franklin Pangborn, bull frog voiced, barrel-chested Eugene Pallette, cigar chomping Ned Sparks… these and so many more lovable character actors are who we look forward to seeing as our dearest ole chums. We all could use a trusted sidekick.

For the seventh consecutive year, we as the blogathon hosting trio of Aurora of Once Upon A Screen/ @CitizenScreen, Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club/ @Paula_Guthat, and yours truly Kellee of Outspoken & Freckled/ @IrishJayhawk66 invite you to join us for the WHAT A CHARACTER! BLOGATHON 2018, December 14, 15, 16, as we pay tribute to the brilliance of the supporting players.

Our objective for the What A Character! Blogathon has always been to shed the spotlight on these lesser-known but equally talented thespians, whose names usually appeared below the title. If you wish salute your favorite on-screen character actor- the quirky maid, that ornery hotel manager, frustrated maître D’, sassy best friend, a hot-tempered heavy, flabbergasted father, sarcastic sidekick, grumpy boss, gobsmacked butler- then you’ve come to the right place. Please review the guidelines below first, and leave me a comment.

  • Let at least one of the hosts know which character actor is your choice.
  • Don’t take it for granted we know exactly who you are or where your blog resides – please include the title and URL of your blog, also your Twitter handle if you have one.
  • We will not accept repeats (previously published posts), or duplicates, since there are so many greats worthy of attention, but your choices are not limited to classics. You can choose any character actor from any era and from the medium of television, which has featured talented regulars since the beginning, and continues to do so.
  • Publish your WAC! post on either December 14, 15, or 16, 2018. Let us know if you have a date preference; otherwise, we’ll split publicizing duties equally among the three days.
  • Please include one of our banners (see below) within your What A Character! post.
  • Additionally, we appreciate when you include [one of] the WAC! 2018 event banner[s] included in this post on your blog itself to help us promote the event.
  • Thank you for sending any of us the direct link to your post once you have published it. Searching on social media sites can lead to missed entries.
  • My contact info: prattkellee@gmail.com / twitter~ @IrishJayhawk66 ~or, simply leave a comment below
  • HAVE FUN and spread the word!

Here are the spectacular banners Aurora has created for you to promote on your blogs…

WAC2018-1

WAC2018_2

Participating blogs and their choice of actors:

Walter Abel ~ Another Old Movie Blog

Sara Allgood ~Maddy Loves Her Classic Films

Lionel Atwill ~ Paula’s Cinema Club

Beulah Bondi ~ Once Upon A Screen

Elisha Cook, Jr. ~ Outspoken & Freckled

Jean Dixon ~ One Gal’s Musings

Alan Hale (Sr) ~ Silver Screen Classics

Margaret Hamilton ~ Wide Screen World

Ed Harris ~ Reel Weedgie Midget Reviews

Eileen Heckart ~ The Last Drive-In

Frieda Inescort ~ Sister Celluloid

Skelton Knaggs ~ Bill Shaffer, guest blogger on Outspoken & Freckled

Jack Lambert ~ Caftan Woman

Charles McGraw ~ The Old Hollywood Garden

Stephen McNally ~ CineMaven’s Essays From The Couch

Agnes Morehead ~ In The Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood

Eugene Pallette ~ Carole & Co.

Elizabeth Patterson ~ Backstory: A Guide To Classic Film

Nat Pendleton ~ Sarah as guest blogger on Once Upon A Screen

Thelma Ritter ~ A Shroud Of Thoughts

Everett Sloane in LADY FROM SHANGHAI ~ Silver Screenings

Kay Thompson ~ The Lady Eve’s Reel Life

0

Vanessa

*This WAC! Blogathon is dedicated in memory to two very fine character actors whom we lost this year. James Karen (1923 – 2018) was a hard-working actor who was a personal friend of Buster Keaton and frequent attendee of the Buster Keaton Celebration in Kansas and the TCMFF. Vanessa Marquez (1968 – 2018) was an extraordinary actress of film and TV and an even better friend. She is greatly missed and we continue to hold her close in our hearts.

Thank you to TCM for the tagline inspiration and to all you bloggers and film fans for your ongoing participation and support for seven years running! And a big ShoutOut to my fellow co-hosts who inspire me all year long for being such marvelous and lovely characters themselves!

~Kellee

 

 

 

Day One: 31 DAYS OF OSCAR BLOGATHON

It’s here! The time has finally arrived to celebrate that marvelously golden man, Oscar. For an entire month, Turner Classic Movies network puts on a grand gala tribute to the winners of that coveted statuette, and for six years we’ve joined the party.

Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 4.15.48 PM

Please join my co-hosts Aurora (aka @CitizenScreen) of Once Upon A Screen, Paula ( aka @Paula_Guthat) of Paula’s Cinema Club, and me this weekend as we showcase bloggers’ works on this glorious subject. For Day One, here is today’s lineup:

Danny of Danny Reviews (twitter @danny_reviews ) perseveres as he chats about MOTION PICTURES (“CHARIOTS OF FIRE” and “THE KING’S SPEECH” : FILMS ABOUT PERSEVERANCE) 

Paddy of Caftan Woman details the BEST DANCE DIRECTION Nominee: SHE (1935) for that category’s first year as an Academy Award. twitter: @CaftanWoman

she2

Steve of Movie Movie Blog Blog (twitter: @MovieBlogger61 ) outlines his picks for 10 EMBARRASSING ACADEMY AWARD MOMENTS .

0vqflqe41rvl4u3ft

Daniel of Movie Mania Madness (twitter: @dsl89) honors the 39th winner for Oscar’s Best Picture, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS.

manforallseasons_gbq

The Gal Herself of One Gal’s Musings takes a look at 1954’s Best Actress Competition with A STAR IS ROBBED: THE 1954 BEST ACTRESS RACE. 

Poster

Annette of Hometowns To Hollywood (twitter: @Home2Hollywood ) reviews how the Academy Awards Ceremonies celebrated with humor and Hope: THE ACADEMY AWARDS AND PLENTY OF HOPE.

Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 3.05.31 PM

Ruth of Silver Screenings (twitter: @925screenings ) goes deep on the Oscars’ origins and answers the question, WHY DO WE HAVE THE OSCARS?

Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 3.16.24 PM

The Story Enthusiast laments over the CLASSIC FILM STARS WHO NEVER WON AN OSCAR.

Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 3.26.15 PM

Dan of Top 10 Films (twitter: @top10films ) lists the TOP TEN HORROR SUCCESSES AT THE OSCARS. 

the_exorcist_ellen_burstyn

Finally our last entry in today’s offerings, Gill of Real Weegie Midget Reviews (twitter: @realweegiemidge ) extols the talents of OSCAR WINNING ACTRESSES IN RETRO ROMANTIC COMEDY MOVIES.

Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 3.37.10 PM

Enjoy reading all of these superb contributions in Day One of our blogathon event. We encourage you to leave glowing feedback for these writers- share the Oscar love! Tomorrow, pop over to Aurora’s site for Day Two entries, followed on Sunday at Paula’s site for Day Three.

day 2: once upon a screen

day 3: paula’s cinema club

Thanks so much for joining us this weekend! Be sure to watch the 90th Oscars Ceremony on ABC this Sunday, March 4th 8pm ET.

Screen Shot 2018-01-28 at 3.29.03 PM

Announcement: 31 Days Of Oscar Blogathon

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences handed out the first Awards at a dinner party for about 250 people on May 16, 1929 to honor movies released from August 1, 1927 – August 1, 1928. The first Academy president, Douglas Fairbanks, hosted and presented in the ceremony held in the Blossom Room of the Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood. The brainchild of MGM studio mogul, Louis B. Mayer, the Academy was formed in 1927 as a non-profit dedicated to the advancement and improvement of the film industry. Some might argue about some of those achievements, but there is one thing that is sure to impress classic movie and Hollywood fans – when the music plays to open this year’s Oscars on March 4, 2018 it will be the 90th time the film industry honors achievements in movies.

Here are the 1929 Winners and Nominees

Screen Shot 2018-01-28 at 3.19.27 PM

If you take the time to look through all of the moments in 90 years of Oscars ceremonies, you’ll find numerous surprises, disappointments and controversy any number of which may spur debate from film aficionados. That’s where we come in. For the sixth consecutive year, I am joining forces with Aurora of Once Upon A Screen aka @CitizenScreen and Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club aka @Paula_Guthat to bring you the 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon. Given Oscar’s special anniversary and all of the memories, we hope you’ll consider joining us to make this the best and brightest outing yet.

Screen Shot 2018-01-28 at 3.29.03 PM

As you know, this blogging event is inspired by Turner Classic Movies’ 31 Days of Oscar marathon, which begins its 23rd installment on February 1. This year the network is presenting the movies based on the categories in which they were awarded or nominated. February 1st will honor Best Original Song Winner and Nominees and the festival kicks off with Busby Berkeley’s Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935). William Wyler’s Ben-Hur (1959) will end the 31-Day presentation on March 3, the day dedicated to Best Picture Winners.

Since both TCM and the Oscars bring to mind our beloved host and favorite historian, Robert Osborne, we thought we would kick off our Blogathon with his words about the 31 Days of Oscar marathon…

“One thing seems to stir the souls of our Turner Classic Movie loyalists like no other: the 31 Days of Oscar salute.” 

Blogathon Details

Rather than hosting the 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon for the entire month of February, as we’ve done in the past, we will host all entries the weekend before the Oscars this year. That is from Friday, February 23 through Sunday, February 25, which leaves Oscar weekend free for last minute movie watching. We’re also combining all topics this year and simply presenting them over the three days. Any Oscar-related topic is fair game. We are not limiting this event to classic film fare as we’d like to see entries covering the entire 90-year history of Oscar, including this year’s nominees. To help get you motivated here are the categories we have used in the past…

  • The Actors
  • The Directors
  • The Motion Pictures
  • Oscar Snubs
  • The Crafts (music, costumes, etc.)
  • New Idea – Oscar Controversies

Most of you know the drill, but as a reminder, adhering to the following is necessary:

  • Let us know what your desired topic is by leaving a comment on any of the host blogs
  • Include the title and link to your blog in the comments area
  • Advise if you have a date preference – Friday 2/23, Saturday 2/24 or Sunday 2/25
  • Include the event banner on your blog and in the entry post to help us promote the event

Restrictions – just two:

  • Please do not submit previously published posts
  • No duplicates will be accepted to ensure we cover as much of Oscar history as possible

We look forward to hearing from you and to reading your entries. As many entries as you want, actually, so get to it!

Until then here’s to Oscar, to TCM and to YOU! Happy Blogging!

Participating Blogs and Topics

Caftan Woman – 1936 Best Dance Direction Nominee, Benjamin Zemach for Hall of Kings from Merian C. Cooper’s SHE (1935)

Blog of the Darned – 7 Films that Should Have Been Nominated for Best Picture

One Gal’s Musings – The 1954 Best Actress Competition

Silver Screenings – How the Oscars Began

Movie Movie Blog Blog – Embarrassing Oscar Moments

Old Hollywood Films – Janet Gaynor’s Three Oscar Wins

Hometowns to Hollywood – Wings (1927)

Critica Retro – The Trouble with Thrillers

Realweegiemidget Reviews – Oscar-winning Actresses in Superhero Movies

Moon in Gemini – Forgotten Winners and Nominees

Cracked Rear Viewer – Claire Trevor in Key Largo

Once Upon a Screen – Why Barbara Stanwyck Should Have Taken Oscar Home in 1942

Danny Reviews – Chariots Of Fire (1981) and The King’s Speech (2010), Best Picture films about perseverance

 

It’s here! 6th Annual WHAT A CHARACTER! Blogathon: Day One

WAC2017

The anticipation is over! Today we bring you the first day of the 6th annual What A Character Blogathon, hosted by yours truly and my fellow co-hosts, the classic film loving ladies: Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club @Paula_Guthat and Aurora of Once Upon A Screen @CitizenScreenings.

As promised, this annual event celebrates the character actors. Quirky and silly roles in the service industry like the frustrated hotel manager or the reliable and sharp-witted maid, a supportive sidekick, the best friend… in so many ways, the character role is often our favorite scene-stealing performances of a film. We invite bloggers to scribe on their favorite characters. Now let’s begin!

Ruth of Silver Screenings brings us THE BEAUTIFUL REFUGEES OF CASABLANCA . She focuses on the lesser-known players in the iconic film in stunning imagery.

Real Weegie Midget Reviews talks about IAN MCSHANE whom he describes as “always been there in movies, on TV and now making his God-like presence known… from cheeky British Chappie to “Dallas” to God-like parts.”

Jack Deth, as guest blogger on Paula’s Cinema Club, describes the “wise ass to the stars” DANIEL STERN, “creating multiple personae for cinema and television, while holding on tightly to his gift of dry, wry. sarcastic and occasional wise-ass humor.”

Steve Bailey of Movie Movie Blog Blog offers a glimpse into “one of those actors whom most people probably wouldn’t recognize by name, but as soon as they see him on-screen, they say, “Yeah, I’ve seen that guy before.”  BRUCE ALTMAN, UNHERALDED SUPPORTING ACTOR.

Wolffian Classics Movies Digest explores EUGENE PALLETTE, “simply a marvelous actor in any role.”

Chris of Blog Of The Darned profiles CHARLES LANE, “Specializing in crabby authority figures, Charles Lane was the go-to guy when film or TV producers needed a mean miserly lawyer, judge, tax collector, banker, or landlord.”

Paddy of Caftan Woman hears the “full, rich baritone – a round voice, a pleasing voice – a voice in control of itself” of JOHN ALEXANDER We know that voice!

Annette of Hometowns To Hollywood road trips via Minnesota to review CLINTON SUNDBERG 

Quiggy of The Midnite Drive-In takes us on a ROAD TO MADNESS, exploring the many character roles of It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

A Person In The Dark reviews “a real pro” who worked both stage and screen, from the silents to the sixties, REGINALD DENNY.

Movie Mom provides her take on THELMA RITTER For her, “Ritter is the very essence of the character actor, creating vitally real, relatable characters who made the world around the stars real and illuminate the story’s themes.”

Thoughts All Sorts shows love for A Strong Character in MARK STRONG.

More to come! Return back here throughout the day for more entries.  As our weekend of What A Character! Blogathon continues, explore Day Two with Aurora at ONCE UPON A SCREEN and Day Three with Paula at PAULA’S CINEMA CLUB.

 

THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR (1999) Bringing Sexy Back

Thomas_Crown_1999_12plane crop

One of those truisms of life is that sequels and remakes rarely equal let alone surpass their original. Not impossible, but rare. When I first watched Norman Jewison’s THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR (1968) I enjoyed the details of the heist, but overall felt underwhelmed. With leading actors like Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway, combined with high style, I was impressed by the visuals (especially the costume design and the mod editing). But the lack of chemistry between Dunaway and McQueen (how could anyone NOT have red hot chemistry with super sexy Steve?!); it left me cold.

download-12

Then the remake came. John McTiernan’s THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR (1999) took Alan Trustman’s original story that centered on a bank heist in the 1968 film and flipped it into an art heist. Rare art heist allowed for a sexier, more stylish plot vehicle to drive this remake with more clever moments of cat-and-mouse pace and better build up of sexual tension.

Screen Shot 2017-11-19 at 7.17.39 PM

Pierce Brosnan is Thomas Crown, the charming and confident billionaire playboy who collects rare paintings and crashes 100 thousand dollar sailboats, just for kicks. He’s bored in life because he’s never found an equal, as we see him relay in confidence to his therapist, who is portrayed by Faye Dunaway. When a heist at the art museum by a group of outsiders goes awry yet leaves a Claude Monet missing, it’s actually Crown who becomes the main suspect. Enter Rene Russo as Catherine Banning, insurance investigator and his greatest adversary and equal.

Screen Shot 2017-11-19 at 7.23.47 PM

Thus begins the chase of cat and mouse. But who is the cat and who is the mouse? Banning works in tandem with the police (Denis Leary and Frankie Faison as Detectives McCann and Paretti) but prefers her work as a soloist. As Banning hunts down her prey, she begins to fall for Crown as he does her. Banning is sexy, boldly stylish, empowered, clever, ambitious, supremely confident and unyielding when she goes for what she wants. They are the same.

I know full well that many of my classic film friends will respond in opposition to my assertion that this film from the late 90s could possibly surpass its classic original. But let’s take a deeper look.

The Heist:

This is no simple set-up and chase crime thriller with guns blazing. This film does a masterful job with clever editing and unexpected plot devices to keep us interested. (Warning: a few spoilers may pop up.) Even in an early scene, a Trojan horse device is literally used as a Trojan horse. All the details from the initial heist to the final reveal involve unique and thought-provoking twists and turns. One of my favorites involves a parade of men in bowler hats as camouflage.

The Style:

images-14

It may not be the cool swinging 60s style of the 1968 film, but style it exudes nonetheless. If sexy is a style, then Brosnan and Russo bring that particular flavor of style in heavy measure throughout. Brosnan is in Bond-form for a commanding presence of athleticism and cool confidence in a classically tailored suit and the occasional similarly cut shirtless look. Fire-haired Russo is draped in bold fashions to match the boldness of her moves. One particular scene is a blush-worthy dance centered on a body-skimming dress worn by Russo that you could read the The New York Times through.

In all of the memorable scenes, Bill Conti’s music plays a key role. Obviously it serves invaluable to bring sex appeal. In other scenes, it quickens the pace and/or provides the right touch of playful whimsy.

The Players:

crown

The ongoing tango between the Crown and Banning characters should be constantly competitive, and electric with sexual tension. Brosnan and Russo deliver. For me, McQueen’s interpretation is appropriately cool as one would expect from him, but his interactions with Dunaway comes across as almost disinterested. As for Dunaway, the style is undoubtedly gorgeous but her coolness transcends into cold. Leary and Faison do a fine job for a sliver of lightness in character acting.

Another test for what ultimately makes the 1999 version the victor for me, is how it holds up in repeat screenings. I find myself enjoying watching the remake many times over as it has held up well. I cannot say the same for its original. (Okay Kell, brace yourself for the pitch fork frenzy of feedback from readers.)

—————

thieves11-1

This has been my contribution to the “It Takes A Thief” Blogathon, hosted by Moon In Gemini, November 17-19, 2017. Be sure to read all the other entries for posts on films that ‘steal’ your attention!

 

 

9 to 5 (1980)… has the workplace really changed?

download-2

In the thirty-seven years since Colin Higgins’ Nine To Five (1980) was released, it’s easy to reflect upon this comedic view on feminism and the office workplace and note the changes. The typewriters and other technologies (or lack thereof), the clothes, hairstyles, cars… they all seem dated to the modern eye. But look deeper. The messages being pitched in this film, the struggles of the main characters, and even of the supporting characters, well, they rage on.

There are many films that have been set in the office workplace. But this film stood out for me. Perhaps based on timing, as I was the highly influential age of thirteen when it released. The second-wave feminism of the sixties and seventies challenged the status quo in the battle of the sexes: Billy Jean King, Title 9, NOW, Roe vs. Wade, the ERA and many more influencers shaped our emerging cultural awareness. Then 9 to 5 came along to challenge sexism and the battle for women’s equality in the American trenches… the workplace.

images-2

Not presented as some radical documentary or anything serious whatsoever, 9 to 5 is a comedy. But the message remains clear as a bell, through the laughter. What strikes interesting is not only that it’s a comedy but I would go further to say it’s a slapstick comedy that fits a formula and styling not unlike a true classic comedy, common several decades prior.

Comedy serves a great purpose to drive the messages home thanks also to a talented cast. Our main characters are Lily Tomlin as the hardworking, single mom and career woman Violet Newstead, Jane Fonda as Judy Bernly, is the meek housewife entering the workforce for the first time, Dolly Parton as the curvy, country- gal and secretary, Doralee Rhodes. Then there’s the boss, Dabney Coleman as Frank Hart. Or as he is better known, “a sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot.”

The trio are an unlikely threesome, each with very different backgrounds so they don’t connect immediately. Their only true connection is not only the company they work for, but the insufferable pig in charge, Mr. Hart. Despite initial misperceptions of one another, they soon bond in being victims of Mr. Hart and his domineering, sexist ways. The pace picks up nicely when Violet mistakenly believes she has accidentally poisoned the boss. In a state of panic, they rally together in crime. No actual poisoning, their true crime turns to kidnapping- to buy time and prove he is embezzling company funds. In the end, the threesome survive and thrive, as do the rest of the staff and the company as a whole under these ladies’ leadership, and of course the villain gets his comeuppance.

images

There are some very appealing reasons to enjoy this often overlooked film…

Girlfriend Friendship:

Unlike so many comedies regarding battle of the sexes, 9 to 5 takes its time to show female friendship, based on how three very different women start off in typical office dynamics. Initially, their differences keeps them apart and whets the water cooler chat. Violet judges Judy (she’s ‘just a no-job-experience housewife’ whom she’s burdened with training, and she mocks her outdated clothing). As Violet and other staff have already judged and assumed the worst of Doralee (she must be shtupping the boss because she’s well-endowed), Violet convinces Judy to believe the same. Because of their common enemy, the three realize just how wrong they were about each other.

So many light comedies prefer to keep women in the catty zone, always competing for the man. It’s often men who are highlighted as the adventurous buddies. This film flips that stereotype. When women move past the barriers of judging each other and trust/support each other instead, they make HUGE accomplishments.

 

 Fantasies Become Reality:

There is a delightful fantasy segment where each of the ladies describes how they’d like to seek revenge on Hart. Timid Judy, who is especially vulnerable now as her husband just left her for his secretary, expresses bold confidence in her fantasy as a wild game hunter. Hart is the target and Judy is well-armed on the hunt with an enormous gun. Classic slapstick is alive and well in this very funny, and rather cartoonish scene. We see Judy blossom in self-esteem throughout the film and the audience knows this is greatly due to their supportive friendships as they go through wild adventures.

images-4

Doralee describes her fantasy where she turns the table on Hart, giving him a healthy dose of his own sexual harassment medicine. Being a country gal, she’s a rodeo star of a boss, lassoing and hogtying him when he politely and repeatedly refuses her inappropriate advances. I always wonder what men thought of this scene when it came out back in 1980. Surely, it would make for great- if not entertaining- training material for HR sexual harassment requirements.

images-6

 

Violet waxes Snow White for a mock Disney spin on her twist of revenge. She may look the spitting image of Snow White, even down to the animated woodland creatures hovering nearby, but Violet’s fairy tale turns ‘Grimm’ as she poisons Hart in her fantasy. Classic slapstick shtick includes a metal spoon eaten away instantaneously by stirring poison and steam in the shape of skull and crossbones. Ultimately, all three land up fulfilling their fantasies to a certain degree. Judy fires (although misses) a gun at Hart. Doralee hogties Hart. And Violet pours poison (accidentally) into Hart’s coffee.

Words, Words, Words:

I think the writers had fun with this one.

+The main characters’ names were somewhat similar to their respective actors, i.e. Violet= Lily (Tomlin).

+Dabney Coleman’s Frank Hart has no heart.

+In 9 to 5, the company’s name is “Consolidated Industries” which I immediately drew a parallel to the dysfunctional office relations in Billy Wilder’s THE APARTMENT (1960), with the company name of, “Consolidated Life of NY.” Likely a mere coincidence of a common word with no connection whatsoever, but that’s how a movie fanatic’s brain works.

+As words go, the 9 to 5 theme song, written and performed by Dolly Parton, became a number 1 hit (Billboard Country Chart), earning Parton an Academy Award nomination, four Grammy Award nominations with two Grammy wins.

+I think my favorite line came from Dolly Parton’s Doralee. At one point when she’s pushed to her limit with Hart’s wolfish behavior, she threatens him. She says she has a loaded gun in her purse and tells him, “turn you from rooster to a hen, with one shot!” as she points directly to his crotch.

Cast:

images-7

The casting is superb. The lead actresses clearly worked well together because that’s apparent on the screen. This was Dolly Parton’s first theatrical feature debut and I think it was the perfect vehicle for her. Tomlin and Fonda were much more experienced on-screen and their comedic chemistry still clicks to this day. The two co-star in the highly amusing and popular show “Grace and Frankie,” currently enjoying its 3rd season release on Netflix.

Coleman was the perfect choice for Frank Hart. Coleman was at the top of his fame with a string of successful features in the early eighties. He excelled at playing scoundrels with a flair for comedy. Many claim this was one of his most memorable roles. There are solid character actors here, as well, including Elizabeth Wilson, Marian Mercer, Peggy Pope, Henry Jones, Richard Stahl, plus a nice cameo from Sterling Hayden as the big boss, Tinsworthy.

If you haven’t seen this film in a long time, I recommend you take another look with fresh eyes. The comedy structure plays like so many of the classics. Look past the outdated styles and technologies, but ponder the bigger question on equality in the workplace. Has it changed so much in these nearly four decades? Isn’t there still a glass ceiling for most and continued unequal pay for equal work? But don’t let that get you down. It simply means we have more progress to accomplish. In the meantime, cherish those friendships- they can be empowering.


This was my contribution to the Workplace in Film & TV Blogathon, hosted by Moon In Gemini, August 18-20, 2017. Follow her site for daily updates with all the participating writers.

workplace1

31 DAYS OF OSCAR BLOGATHON- Day 2

hattie-1

Taking the baton from fellow co-host Aurora of Once Upon A Screen, who brought us the initial round of blogger contributions yesterday, today I pick up on the second day of the 31 Days Of Oscar Blogathon. Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club will pick up the final day tomorrow. Explore all three days for three days for the best in the blogger biz for everything Oscar.

Just a reminder, this is our 5th year hosting this event in conjunction with Turner Classic Movies network’s month-long event to honor the Academy’s Oscars. TCM is showcasing this year’s special programming in alpha order. Click here for more info: TCM’s 31 Days Of Oscar

Now, onto today’s lineup!

Pop Culture Pundit takes a look at the brilliance of PURPLE RAIN: A Traditional Musical With an Anti-Traditional Score.

CineMaven’s Essays From The Couch presents Jeff Lundenberger as guest blogger as he goes deep in the Best Actress field of 1950 with, And The Winner Is…

Charlene’s (Mostly) Classic Movie Reviews discusses the beauty and bleakness of existence in The Diving Bell and Butterfly (2007)

Wolffian Classic Movies Digest explores the unforgettable oblique angles and visual styles of Cinematography in THE THIRD MAN.

Weegie Midget swoops in for a caped landing with Best Actor Oscar Winners in Superhero Movies!

Blogged Of The Darned enjoys life’s banquet in 3 Beekman Place- The Art Direction/ Set Design of AUNTIE MAME. I promise you won’t starve to death when reading this one.

I will continue to add more posts later today so check back for more blogger bliss! And to all the participating writers and readers alike, Aurora, Paula and I cannot THANK YOU enough for your continuing support!

…Kellee

oscars

 

 

 

 

Love is Served Up in WIMBLEDON (2004)

images-2

I’m not a huge sports nut. I’m what could be described as selectively passionate. I could care less about football. European or American. I couldn’t tell you when the NBA season is. But there are a couple of sports and a few teams I follow and cheer with vigor. University of Kansas Men’s Basketball (aka the Jayhawks, hence my twitter moniker @IrishJayhawk66), the Kansas City Royals in the MLB, and tennis. Anything and anyone tennis. It’s the only sport I can honestly say I enjoy playing it as much as I do watching it.

And for a film fanatic, I look for any tennis references on the big screen, classic or modern. It’s not a common theme, to be certain. Almost rare, actually. So I’m grateful for Hitchcock’s apparent love for the game. But that’s for another discussion. There is one film that does a marvelous job of tackling the sport of tennis head-on and it’s wrapped up in a nice film with a fine cast, a bit schmaltzy in formula but manages to churn out a cute little RomCom. While clearly a romantic comedy, it stays on the main theme of tennis rather adeptly, and balances subplots and a variety of supporting characters to keep it interesting.

images-7

Paul Bettany, that charming tall, and slim Brit that you may know as the voice in Tony Stark’s head for you Marvel fans, plays our main character Peter Colt. Once ranked 11th in the world is now 119th, and owner of a few cool champion titles, but never quite made it TRULY big time, Peter finds himself dragging his tired game off to his last Wimbledon where he intends to announce his retirement as a pro. The future of grudgingly charming the catty, mature ladies of leisure in tennis skirts at the local tennis club as their new Tennis Director awaits his fate.

His career path isn’t his only source of pessimism and trouble. Back home, his parents are constantly bickering and his brother is a rather weaselly fellow, portrayed by one of my favorite actors of this generation, James McAvoy. When he’s not at home in his cycling gear watching porn he’s at the bookie because he prefers to bet against and profit from his brother’s loses at every turn. And because it’s cutie McAvoy, we don’t hate him, we simply don’t trust him. Like you might with your own little brother.

images-1

But life isn’t a total downer for Peter. When he arrives at his hotel, there’s a room mix-up and he walks into a fresh-from-the-shower, naked Kirsten Dunst as Lizzie. They meet again later on the practice courts. Sparks fly as a forward and frank Lizzie makes a play for the self-deprecating and charming Peter. I should warn you now that I’m not generally much of a fan of snaggle-toothed Dunst. Her performance is a bit flat or perhaps its my bias but despite that, I very much enjoy her character as the American tennis pro who knows what she wants and boldly and unapologetically goes after it.

At one point as Peter Colt is entering the third round of Wimbledon, he is challenged with facing his long-time practice partner and friend, Dieter (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau). Side note: I really liked Peter’s friendship with his practice partner who happens to be gay, as is another female player. But they do a good job of inclusion while not playing up these characters in some stereotypical, unnatural, over the top tone.

giphy.gif

Lizzie advises him that he has to choose whether to play him like a friend or an opponent in a Grand Slam. “You practice together, you travel together, you practically live together. Do you really have what it takes to close out a friend in the third round of Wimbledon? Because that is killing. It’s a bullet to the heart. That’s what’s tough about this game. There’s a winner and there’s a loser. And tomorrow, one of you is going to be a loser.”Peter wins.

2425046,YbaW+S0Nk9IrXO0QCnIQawdIBHTqZL2AId_hyIjlV1i5vlLma+InCuf+WGyZGONpFG54BcGDKzs2m9EcdXUIwQ==

She prefers to keep their relationship casual and purely physical. Peter finds himself falling for her and it appears his unexpected successes on the court (he never expected to make it past the first round) may be a result of being inspired by his growing affections for Lizzy. Meanwhile, Lizzie’s dad aka her micromanaging coach, portrayed by Sam Neill sporting an American accent, approaches Peter to tell him to back off. He worries Peter will be a distraction.

Back at the hotel, Peter’s agent Ronnie (Jon Favreau) shows up out of the blue, after dropping Peter like a hot brick over a year ago, now that Peter’s winning. To make matters more complicated, Peter’s agent also represents several other players. Enter American tennis pro, Jake Hammond. He’s the sort of cocky, arrogant prick we love to hate. Plus he keeps trying to make moves on Lizzie that she’s been rebuffing before Peter was even in the picture. As a predictable formula would follow, a public confrontation is displayed at a party for the top players as a rejected Hammond insults Lizzie in front of Peter. Colt punches him to the ground and the two love birds escape the paparazzi as dad, left behind at the party, calls out after his daughter.

McAvoy-in-Wimbledon-james-mcavoy-19635041-400-298

Carl and his wanker friends

The two drive to Peter’s seaside hometown where he grew up to his flat. The flat looks like a place Peter rarely visits from all his years of traveling in tournaments across the world. However, his wanker of a brother Carl has made himself at home already, along with his tacky, low brow friends. Peter kicks them out but Carl sells out his brother yet again by leaking a photo and their secret whereabouts to the press, which leads to their romantic escape being cut short by Lizzie’s father’s unexpected visit.

Not being able to keep away, Peter sneaks into Lizzie’s room one night before a big match. She loses the next morning and is out of the tournament. Lizzie bitterly blames Peter for her defeat, “The only thing you fell in love with this week was winning…. Love means nothing in tennis. Zero. It only means you lose.” Sore loser, Lizzie.

images

After overcoming many obstacles, Peter has found himself facing Hammond in the finals. But does Peter have what it takes? He’s playing at his very best of his entire career, on what will be his last competitive match as a pro, and yet tennis seems to suddenly mean a great deal less to him than love from Lizzie.

That’s the interesting thing about the sport of tennis. It’s SUCH a mental game. I realize in every sport there’s the balance for the athlete of their own physicality and their confidence to win. But tennis is a game where you are almost more competitive with yourself than with your opponent. In team sports like basketball, football, etc, there’s more focus on the process of individuals coming together as a whole unit, like a collection of parts in a finely tuned machine. Not in tennis. A tennis player stands alone. Ace or choke, win or lose, the tennis player often finds themselves relying upon their own inner dialogue, with no coach nor cheerleaders on the sidelines.

Wimbledon 1.png

This film does an excellent job of capturing that. We often see Peter having inner conflicts via inner dialogue as he stands at the baseline. And while I found this extremely pleasing to see all the references that only a tennis player and a tennis fan could fully appreciate, there’s plenty of entertainment served up for folks whose only tennis knowledge is, “that’s where that McEnroe fella that would yell a lot, right?” (And I was happy to see Johnny Mac, Chris Evert and Mary Carillo make cameos, too.)

There’s something to love here for everyone though, for fans of… tennis, British humor, romantic comedies (including a two week comet blazing across the sky is a metaphor of the fire of their romance) and frankly it’s just a sweet little story that even classic film fans can appreciate and should be your next guilty pleasure this summer.

athlete-bthn_ewilliams

*This post was my contribution to the Athletes In Film Blogathon, hosted by Once Upon A Screen and Wide Screen World, June 4-5th, 2016. Check out their blog sites for the full list of participants. Great reading to kick off this summer. I’ll end on a few images of other tennis moments and references captured via Hollywood…

8aa9a129-1287-4845-8a40-0f5dd27d762e.gif

images-4images-5

images-3images-61dc3c5eaec0879d41f5ae04eab5f4b65

Screen Shot 2016-06-03 at 4.06.47 PM

pat-and-mike-1952-001-photographers-tennis-00n-9zp

[Old Hollywood had a love affair with tennis so why more films were not made about tennis is beyond me…]

%d bloggers like this: