Fangirling Doris Day

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My love for Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff is no secret. As a classic film obsessive, I’m often asked who my favorite (male and female) movie stars are. With zero hesitation, Cary Grant and Doris Day. Even her name reflects that Day was destined to be star. Her mother gave her the name “Doris” after the silent film star Doris Kenyon. Later, “Day” was inspired from her early years singing with big band leader greats like Barney Rapp, who suggested she take the Day surname from the song, “Day By Day.” (Take a listen here: https://youtu.be/AqFfe6Y97Yc )

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Dancing was her initial attempt at stardom. She even won a $500 contest that routed her to Hollywood, but those dancing dreams dashed away the day before her trip, due to a car accident which seriously injured her. So her mother encouraged her to switch focus to singing. This landed her on the radio, followed by the concert stage, with bandleader greats like Bob Crosby and Les Brown and His Band of Renown. By the mid ’40s, her sultry yet approachable voice was quite popular, especially with the WW2 troops, and reaching the charts with number one singles such as “Sentimental Journey.” The time had come to transition that magical songbird to Hollywood musicals.

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She was a natural talent on screen. There was something so vibrant, so magnetic about her presence. As a novice to Hollywood in 1947, with her already seasoned voice combined with her stunning beauty, she was a standout even amongst the most shining constellations of stars. Beyond the colorfully light fare of musicals with the likes of Jack Carson, Doris sprinkled in more dramatic roles. In the ’50s, Day took on darker, juicier roles like the jazz singer paired with an obsessive Kirk Douglas in YOUNG MAN WITH A HORN (1950), as Ginger Rogers’ sister embroiled with the KKK in STORM WARNING (1951), as a desperate mother, along with Jimmy Stewart as the dad, fighting to save the life of their kidnapped son in Hitchcock’s 2nd attempt at THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956), and as the abused singer Ruth Etting in LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME (1955).

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THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956) helped solidify the featured song “Que Sera, Sera” as the reigning signature song of her career. Meanwhile, LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME stands as the most memorable of her dramatic roles. Unfortunately, this is in part due to the emotional pains Day suffered while filming the intense scenes of abuse paired with James Cagney. Day and Cagney were only performing roles of course, but during such pivotal scenes Doris couldn’t help but be painfully reminded of her first husband, jazz trombonist Al Jorden, who violently beat her while she was pregnant with her only child, Terry.

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As audiences said goodbye to the ’50s and mega musicals grew out of favor, Doris reinvented herself yet again with sex comedies in the 1960s. Many of these comedies are considered the most memorable of her career to this day. In films like PILLOW TALK (1959), LOVER COME BACK (1961), and THE THRILL OF IT ALL (1963), Day reflected society’s changing times as an empowered, talented woman with a career. Many of these films continued to focus on the battle of the sexes, sometimes as a savvy single gal in the workforce, sometimes as a mom juggling multiple roles while struggling to seek greater balance of power. And no one did all of this, while also projecting a powerhouse of stunning fashions, quite like Doris Day.

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Her career started as a jazz/big band singer in 1939 at the age of seventeen. On the Columbia records label, she created over 650 recordings within 2 decades from 1947 to 1967.

Day co-starred with some of the biggest names in the Golden Age of Hollywood during this time. Rock Hudson, Cary Grant, James Garner, Jack Lemmon, and Rod Taylor are just a few. With every role, and every A-list leading man, she shined even brighter. As for her reputation that she was typecast as the virginal girl-next-door, I wholeheartedly disagree. She was following the code handed down to her just like all the other actresses of her time. If you doubt her ability to exude a breathy, come-hither sex appeal, I highly suggest you watch her sex comedies again. (Or, schedule an appointment with your optometrist and cardiologist.)

Before I move on from my fangirling nirvana, I must point out what I believe to be her greatest strength: her instinct for physical comedy and masterful comedic timing.

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I don’t think Doris Day receives anywhere near the credit she wholly deserves for her innate sense of comedy. To me, it always feels like a fresh, new experience to witness her reactions, her interplay with fellow cast performances, her animated facial gestures. Absolutely- and hilariously- brilliant, every time. How is this even possible? I believe the answer lies in her authenticity. Her charisma was straight from the heart.

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Doris Day made her final feature film in 1968, co-starring with Brian Keith in WITH SIX YOU GET EGG ROLL. It’s such a funny and heartwarming movie that reflects very realistic challenges of blending families, a subject I’m personally familiar. Day’s career turned to television appearances, including her own show, “The Doris Day Show” (1968 – 1973).

Sadly, her main reason for even doing the show was because her manager/3rd husband Martin Melcher died, and upon his death, Day discovered he had made arrangements to terminate her Warner Brothers contract and start this TV gig, completely unknown to her. Tragically, she also discovered that Melcher, along with his business partner Jerome Rosenthal, had squandered over $20 million of Day’s earnings over the entire 17-year period of Melcher’s marriage to Doris. She had no choice but to do the show to earn back her money.

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Her strength and tenacity, in addition to her many assets, is impressive. But more so, my love fest with her also stems from those glimmers of a connection to my idol. I don’t share ANY of her talents. Not even close. But I love her fashionista goddess ways. I love that she had freckles. I love her deep passion for animals. (Yes, I belong to the Doris Day Animal Foundation.) I love her lifelong friendship with Rock. And I love that she was a survivor. She survived… a father that left/ran off with her mother’s friend when she was young, abuse from her first husband, death of her child, financial whirlwinds of great success to deeply in debt and back to into the black again, and four lousy marriages with men that clearly didn’t deserve her.

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In my own way, I felt a connection to Doris Day that went beyond admiration. I know many are mourning our darling of screen and song. To me, her light has not faded. Her gifts she bestowed to us continues to shine brightly. So, I’ll pop in my favorite Doris film, then play one of my Doris Day vinyls. See you on the flip side, Doris. I bet Rock is teasingly calling you Eunice right now.

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Ray Harryhausen Film Notes: 20 MILLION MILES TO EARTH (1957)

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*The following are film study notes, as part of an ongoing Ray Harryhausen course I instruct in Lawrence, Kansas. 

What do you do when you’re a hard-working special effects guy, but need a European vacation? If you are Ray Harryhausen, you kill 2 birds with one stone by simply creating a monster movie opportunity in Italy.

That’s exactly what Harryhausen did when he came up with the idea for 20 MILLION MILES TO EARTH (1957). Not only did he create a movie that allowed him to scout Italy for 2 weeks so he could work while sight-seeing, but how often do you hear of the special effects tech being the origin point for a film? As we’ve discussed before, Ray Harryhausen stood alone in his legacy.

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Building very loosely on the tried and true concept of a Kong-esque (but from Venus) story, of a tortured and misunderstood creature destroying a major city, Ray worked with Charlotte Knight for expanding “The Giant Ymir” idea. While never referred by name in the film, this strange friend from Venus was called “Ymir” on set, a name based on the Norse god of Scandinavian mythology. Ymir’s likeness will be repeated by Ray when we watch the Kraken creature in CLASH OF THE TITANS (1981).

While other studios shied away from Ray’s complex drawings that he pitched, Charles Schneer of the B-unit at Columbia Pictures accepted. He was already confident of Harryhausen’s abilities, with the proviso that the script be reworked from Knight’s treatment. Nathan Juran had the necessary experience with the giant-creature-on-the-loose genre, having also directed THE DEADLY MANTIS (1957). He would later helm the classic Harryhausen film The 7th Voyage of Sinbad(1958) as well as the TV series Voyage to the Bottom of the SeaLost in Space and Land of the Giants.

Noteworthy…

Rereleased under the title, “The Beast From Space.”

Most of the noises made by Ymir are recordings of elephant noises played at a higher speed.

Ray Harryhausen wanted the film to be shot in color, but the filmmakers were not given a budget large enough to accommodate color filming. In 2007, five years after the death of the film’s director, Harryhausen worked with the restoration and colorization experts at Legend Films to create a colorized version of the film.

Ray Harryhausen makes a cameo appearance as the zookeeper!

Talking Points/Questions for Discussion:

The narrative intro is placed in space with an image of a galaxy and discusses the atomic age and the burden of responsibilities of nuclear war, in addition to nods to the “race for space.” This film was released right on the cusp of that time- what are your thoughts on that influence in alien creature features like this?

This formula has several standards in storytelling. How does this film fit that mold and in what ways does it branch out?

Why do you believe this film became a cult classic?

What ways do you believe this storyline sent a message to 1957 audiences regarding international cooperation in space exploration, if any?

Ray’s Creature List:

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Space rocket- This giant craft crash lands in the water off the coast of Sicily, fresh from a trip back from Venus. In order to show this mega space craft fly through the skyline, crash into the sea, where fishermen climb in and rescue a couple of astronauts, and barely escape prior to sinking, Ray’s magic was on full display to blend stop-motion animation with live action.

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Ymir- We see this unique creature interact with stop-motion animated people, iconic buildings (like a bridge and the famed Roman Colosseum ruins), and even battle an elephant. Impressive special effects with Italy as the live-action background. Even more impressive is Ray’s marvelous ability to create an empathetic character in this creature, who evokes emotions and human-like mannerisms. I don’t know about you, but I was rooting for this fella!

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Elephant- This was an epic battle, where you cheer on both sides but mostly steer clear. The realistic details on this elephant are astounding even to this day, and the chest rising and falling upon defeat is an authentic and endearing touch.

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Producer: Charles H. Schneer
Director: Nathan Juran
Screenplay: Christopher Knopf, Bob Williams, based on a story by Charlotte Knight
Art Direction: Cary Odell
Cinematography: Irving Lippman
Visual Effects: Ray Harryhausen
Film Editing: Edwin H. Bryant
Original Music: Mischa Bakaleinikoff
Principal Cast: William Hopper (Calder), Joan Taylor (Marisa), Frank Puglia (Dr. Leonardo), Thomas Brown Henry (Gen. A.D. McIntosh), John Zaremba (Dr. Judson Uhl), Jan Arvan (Contino).

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Ray Harryhausen Film Notes: THE 7th VOYAGE OF SINBAD (1958)

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*The following are my notes as part of an ongoing Ray Harryhausen film study course, which I currently instruct in Lawrence, Kansas.

We are about to set sail for a new type of adventure in our quest to explore the world of Ray Harryhausen. In this week’s screening and discussion, we take a marked turn from the black-and-white science fiction monsters and aliens. In Nathan H Juran’s THE 7th VOYAGE OF SINBAD (1958), Ray Harryhausen ventures into a fantasy voyage- in color- for the first time.

Filmed in Technicolor, this kicks off the first of the three Sinbad films in the Harryhausen filmography. It also denotes the first time we see the term “Dynamation” used. Dynamation was a new brand for Ray’s style of stop-motion animation painstakingly blended with live action. Now filming in color, producer Charles Schneer felt they needed to market Ray’s special talents and designate his special effects as a modern update that is a significantly different effect from standard animation. Schneer was inspired by his Buick automobile that was embellished with the word “Dynaflow” on the wheel, which led to the new branding. Interestingly, this “Dynamation” term didn’t always stick. Other terms such as “Dynarama” and “SuperDynamation” were used in later films.

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As typical for many of the films partnering Ray Harryhausen and producer Charles Schneer, it all began with Ray’s drawings. Ray created a dozen such detailed drawings many tears prior to meeting Schneer, which he then presented for his concept for this particular film. Ray had his misgivings about the transition to color, which presented new challenges for his stop-motion animation techniques when sandwiching with live action. Ultimately, Schneer prevailed in convincing Ray to embrace color. Ray was able to produce this “dynamation” with stunning results.

Filmed in a remote section of Spain and on a tight budget, filming and production presented its own challenges. For example, after the long haul to this remote area in Spain far from any nearby cities, the prop crew realized the swords were left behind. So, they chopped down tree branches, formed and painted the wooden swords right on the spot.

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Most of the filming was done on a sound stage in Madrid. To capture the ‘princess on a pillow scene,’ Kathryn Grant stood on a giant pillow that was 25 feet high by 40 feet wide in size, occupying a corner of the sound stage. A camera crane then pulled back 70 feet to create the effect that she is doll-sized. In the end, this sequence and all the scenes were processed through a Technicolor optical printer in London.

After the live action sequences were all filmed, it was then turned over to Ray Harryhausen who spent 14 to 18 months splicing in his work.

Music:

This is the first, of four, film collaborations between Ray Harryhausen and composer Bernard Herrmann. They additionally collaborated on THE THREE WORLDS OF GULLIVER (1960), MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (1961), and JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS (1963). In my opinion, this score is truly magnificent and should be considered not only one of Harryhausen’s best music scores within his filmography, but also as one of Herrmann’s, as well.

When you listen carefully to the opening titles score of this film, which takes just under two minutes, it’s as breath-taking and heart-thumping as many of his most-popular scores composed for an Alfred Hitchcock film. For example, listen to the overture (opening title music) of The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (https://youtu.be/s9eBhmIIf8k ) then listen to the overture music for North By NorthWest: https://youtu.be/db4LjufUY-Y Additionally, Herrmann’s treatment of the skeleton warrior scene is especially playful and memorable; a true signature.

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Well-known soundtrack producer Robert Townson has worked on many Herrmann projects, including the extended re-recording of a 7th Voyage Of Sinbad score by The Royal Scottish National Orchestra. In an October 1998 interview, Townson was asked about his attraction to this particular film score, he replied…

It’s always been one of my favorites and I don’t think I’m alone in feeling that way. It’s so rich and vibrant. Herrmann is clearly having fun with it. I mean, he really just went crazy. It’s so witty and charming. He covers so much ground. I would cite The 7th Voyage of Sinbad as one of the scores which most validates film music as an art form and a forum where a great composer can write a great piece of music. As pure composition I would place Sinbad beside anything else written this century and not worry about it being able to stand on its own.

For the full interview on the Bernard Herrmann site:  http://www.bernardherrmann.org/articles/interview-townson/

Cast:

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Kerwin Mathews was under contract for Columbia and made the perfect choice for Sinbad. He was athletic, handsome, and adapted well to the unique skills needed for the action scenes to counter the stop-motion animation. From talking to a miniature princess on a pillow, to sword-fighting creatures like giant cyclops, a two-headed Roc, a skeleton warrior and even a dragon. Mathews worked with Italian Olympic fencing coach Enzo Musumeci-Greco for the fighting scenes. Greco stood in for the fighting skeleton but for the final shoot, Mathews had to pantomime fighting his opponent.

When Mathews was able to see the finished product for the first time at a premiere in Monte Carlo, even he was astounded by Ray’s work. He felt as though he was watching a completely different film from the one that he filmed in Spain, thanks to the magic of Ray Harryhausen. Mathews would work with the Ray Harryhausen magic again, when he appeared in the starring role in THE THREE WORLDS OF GULLIVER (1960), where once again he proved he could handle the task of portraying a ‘giant role’ in contrast to his miniature co-stars.

He retired from acting in 1978, when he moved to San Francisco to become an antiques dealer. He attended film conventions occasionally and always appreciated his fans and acting days. Overall, he kept his private life quiet. In 1961, he met Tom Nicoll, who was his life partner for 46 years, until his death. Tom was a British display manager for Harvey Nicolls. Kerwin died July 5th, 2007, at the age of 81.

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 Kathryn Grant portrays Princess Parisa, who spends a majority of this film appearing tiny enough to fit in Sinbad’s hand. You may also know Kathryn as Bing Crosby’s 2nd wife, Kathryn Crosby. When Bing married Kathryn, he had been a widower for 5 years. He was 54 years old at the time, Kathryn was 24. Born Olive Kathryn Grandstaff, she had been performing since age 3 and continued to find work on the big screen. But this film was a big break for Kathryn, giving her a starring role. This was not the first time Mathews and Grant performed together. They both appeared in a little film noir, starring Kim Novak, FIVE AGAINST THE HOUSE (1955). Usually playing small roles [such as an uncredited party girl at the song writer’s party in REAR WINDOW (1954), Lt. Betty Bixby in OPERATION MAD BALL (1957) with Jack Lemmon, and as Mary Pilant in ANATOMY OF A MURDER (1959)], her career was just starting to gain traction when she semi-retired after marrying Crosby. Kathryn remains active and is still with us.

In a 2016 interview, she was asked, “Did you enjoy playing the leading lady in “The 7th Voyage of Sinbad,” which is now a cult classic?”

“It was wonderful. Jean Louis, Columbia’s big designer, made me gorgeous clothes. And then we shot in Spain, in Granada and Majorca and Barcelona and Madrid. We didn’t know what was going on much of the time. During the swordfight with skeletons, Kerwin (Mathews) was looking at a stick, and then (visual effects master) Ray Harryhausen did all of the drawings afterwards. Columbia Pictures was wonderful.”

To read the entire interview:  https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/music/kathryn-crosby-bing-crosby-s-widow-brings-irving-berlin-revue-to-li-1.11563275

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Richard Eyer portrays the Genie boy. The studio cut costs by filming his scenes in California, at a salary of $600 per day. In comparison to his co-stars, Eyer’s acting career was in many ways more prolific, with twice the career under his belt by late puberty. He was a child actor with 54 acting credits from age 7 to age 22.

When I think of Eyer, I enjoy his role as little Billy Kettle in a couple of the Ma and Pa Kettle films, plus as the boy with the pet goose in William Wyler’s FRIENDLY PERSUASION (1956). But many science fiction fans may recall him more as the boy with Robby the Robot in the FORBIDDEN PLANET (1956) follow-up, THE INVISIBLE BOY (1957). Eyer was also known for westerns, many TV series, and even crime thrillers. After quitting acting, he married (now divorced), had three children, and taught elementary school in Bishop, California. He still resides in that area.

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Torin Thatcher, who spins troubles and magic as Sokurah in this film, boasted the largest filmography of them all, though. From 1927 to 1976, Thatcher performed 154 acting gigs. He firmly projects a commanding presence on screen and has a full resume of stern and villainous roles. Born to British parents in Bombay, India in 1905, he began with a more Shakespearean stage onset to acting, but then found his way to a multitude of genres on the big and small screen. He passed March 4th, 1981.

Ray’s Creatures Checklist:

Tonight, we will be looking for the following creatures of Ray Harryhausen’s creation…

Serpent Woman

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Cyclops- TWO of them!

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Roc Hatchling

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Roc

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Fighting Skeleton

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Dragon

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Questions and thoughts for discussion:

How does this film compare to the film Ray made just one year (release date) prior with MILLION MILES TO EARTH, in terms of his special effects?

Now in color, what are, if any, noteworthy differences from his black-and-white work?

What do you notice about lighting, shadows, and live action blending?

What are some examples of Ray infusing personality and/or humanistic qualities to a creature?

In this film, what is your favorite stop-motion animated character?

What impact did the performances, Technicolor, Bernard Herrmann, and Jean Louis costumes have in adding to the success of this film?

For a fun bonus, we listened to a promotional song called, “Sinbad May Have Been Bad, But He’s Been Good To Me.” It’s swinging, sultry, little number that was given to select theatre managers (for playing in the lobby), as a marketing tool for the holiday 1958 release. Sung by Ann Leonardo. Take a listen: https://youtu.be/S_qZWzzAM3A

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Top Picks for 2019 TCM Film Festival

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Every year, devoted fans and attendees giddily await the full schedule release of the Turner Classic Movies Film Festival. This year, the anticipation was even more palatable as this is the 10th anniversary. Happily, the time has arrived and after much anguishing decision-making, I have outlined my choices. As always, I cannot be held responsible for last-minute changes that often occur.

TCM Film Festival Schedule- Kellee’s 1st draft of picks

Thu 4/11:

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6:45 – 8 pm … NIGHT WORLD (1932) / Multiplex 6

*Wherever possible, I will choose a Pre-Code, especially if it’s a Pre-Code that I’ve never seen before. This particular film checks both of those boxes and will be introduced by TCM friend and daughter of Boris Karloff, Sara Karloff. There’s an eclectic cast of Boris Karloff, Lew Ayres, George Raft, Mae Clarke, plus a Busby Berkeley choreographed music number. Count me in!

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9:30 – 11:30 pm … THE BACHELOR and the BOBBY-SOXER (1947) / The Egyptian

*Cary Grant. In sparkly, shimmering nitrate. He reminds me of a man. What man? The man with the power. What power? The power of hoodoo. Hoodoo? You do. Do what? Remind me of a man. Need I say more? To boot, there’s the stunning Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple.

 Fri 4/12:

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9 – 10:30am … MERRILY WE GO TO HELL (1932) / Multiplex 1

*Here I go with another delicious Pre-Code discovery. Directed by the brilliant Dorothy Arzner, and starring Sylvia Sydney and Frederic March, this one features marital cheating, Prohibition-era excessive drinking, and a young Cary Grant. Slainte! Anytime I can experience an intro by Cari Beauchamp, I’m there.

 1 – 2pm … The Descendants/ Club TCM

*This is a panel of family members of Old Hollywood stars. Jennifer Grant, daughter of Cary Grant, will be present. Done.

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2:45 – 4:15pm … MY FAVORITE WIFE (1940) / The Egyptian

*This is a favorite film of mine. To me, Cary Grant had the most comedic chemistry with co-star Irene Dunne. The only other Screwball comedy that tops this one for this pairing is THE AWFUL TRUTH. But to see this pairing attempt to get out of a non-stop series of jams often from Gail Patrick, up on the big screen with my pals, will be heaven indeed. Jennifer Grant herself will intro. Perhaps she’ll discuss that silly leopard print robe.

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5:30 – 6:45 pm … VANITY STREET (1932) / Multiplex 6

*Here is yet another Pre-Code discovery, with an intro by Cari Beauchamp. A poverty row romance, starring Charles Bickford, Helen Chandler and George Meeker, claims to include hard knocks aplenty of poverty, blackmail and imprisonment. Let’s go!

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7:30 – 8:45 pm … OPEN SECRET (1948) /Multiplex 6

* This B thriller is said to be a Film Noir that tackles the evils of Anti-Semitism, starring John Ireland, Jane Rudolph and Leonard Sheldon. Cinematography by George Robinson and restored by UCLA. For me, it’s another discovery. I would love to see Eddie Muller do the intro but his glaring absence is not too surprising considering the timing of whenever TCMFF follows so closely after Noir City. Eddie, we’ll toast one to you in addition, with our Andrea Rosen tribute at the Roosevelt bar.

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 9:30 – 11:15 pm … ROAD HOUSE (1948) / The Egyptian

*Starring Ida Lupino, Richard Widmark, and Cornel Wilde, this film noir takes the gritty streets to the country. In nitrate. A nitrate noir? Yes, please! Filmmaker Bill Morrison intros with an 8 minute short of his own.

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Midnight screening … SANTO vs THE EVIL BRAIN (1961) / Multiplex 1

*My only attempt at a midnight screening goes to a superhero called ‘the Saint” who takes on a mind-controlling mad scientist. Santo was an ongoing character and I believe I’ve seen the version where he takes on martians. This one stars Rodolfo Guzman Huerta, the Mexican wrestler turned actor and was filmed in Cuba, before the political climate radically changed. Noting the Cuban connection, it seems rather appropriate to attend with my good friend Aurora, my Cubish sister. Let’s hope I can stay awake after such a long days of screenings.

 Sat 4/13:

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9:15 – 10:45 am … WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE (1951) / Multiplex 1

*I’m excited to see this mid-century Science Fiction, starring Barbara Rush. John Hoyt, and Richard Derr. I’m honored to say that I’ve experienced enjoying dinner with Barbara Rush at a prior TCMFF, thanks to my pal Danny Miller, so seeing her introduce her film will be a special treat. Additionally, as I’m currently teaching a course on special effects/ stop-motion animator Ray Harryhausen, I’m curious to see the Oscar-winning special effects by Harry Barndollar and Gordon Jennings. This was produced by George Pal [DESTINATION MOON (1950)], too.

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11:45 – 2 pm … TARZAN AND HIS MATE (1934) / Multiplex 6

*I’ve been very fortunate to see Ben Burtt & Craig Barron introduce THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD and GUNGA DIN in years’ past. This hat-wearing duo always brings a delightfully insightful and unique presentation that explores the sound and visual effects behind the scenes. And who could say no to loin-clothed Maureen O’Sullivan as Jane and Johnny Weissmuller as Tarzan. This was infamous art director Cedric Gibbons’ sole directing gig.

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2:45 – 5 pm … FATHER GOOSE (1964) / Multiplex 1

*Here’s another Cary Grant comedy gem, juggling war enemies, wayward school girls and their persnickety prep teacher, and booze in the occupied South Pacific during WW2. Grant’s chemistry with Leslie Caron peaks in a hilarious scene where Caron takes in more wine than venom from a feigned snake bite. Leonard Maltin and members of the original cast will intro.

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 5:15 – 6:45 pm … BLOOD MONEY (1933) / Multiplex 6

*With Judith Anderson, George Bancroft, and Frances Dee, this Pre-Code discovery explores a myriad of dark themes with unexpected roles and was one of the first films condemned by the Legion of Decency. Bruce Goldstein will intro this cool Pre-Code.

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8 – 10:15 pm … THE BAD SEED (1956) / Poolside

*Whenever this film comes on TCM, I stop to watch. A psychopathic, child serial killer was hardly a topic typically addressed in mid-century Hollywood. Interestingly, the treatment borders camp. Somehow, I’ve never attended a poolside screening. With the chance to see Patty McCormack in-person to do the intro, I’ll happily dive into these dangerous waters!

Sun 4/14:

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 9:15 – 11 am … HOLIDAY (1938) / Multiplex 1

*That’s right. Another Cary Grant film. I’ve seen this many times as Kate Hepburn skips out of a New Years’ Eve party along with an intoxicated Lew Ayres, Grant, Edward Everett Horton and Jean Dixon. But never on the big screen with Diane Baker doing the intro. Yummy!

~> My Sunday gets real loosey-goosey from here. Probably a couple of Club TCM presentations, lunching, perhaps TBAs, and then maybe…

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5:15 – 7 pm for A WOMAN OF AFFAIRS (1928)/ The Egyptian.

*This on and off screen romance of Greta Garbo and John Gilbert is a forbidden love silent. I’m lucky to see silent films with musical accompaniment in my home state of Kansas more than the average film fan, so my attendance is mostly for the intro with Kevin Brownlow and Leonard Maltin, with Carl Davis score and live orchestra.

Depending upon my energy level and craving for socialization, I may finish out the fest by attending my final screening pick with:

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8 – 10 pm screening of THE DOLLY SISTERS (1948)/ The Egyptian. 

*This lavish Technicolor musical stars Betty Grable and June Haver and is presented in nitrate. Should be a feast for the eyes and the ears.

As a backup, I may opt for dinner and relaxing before Closing Party, which begins at 9pm. What is not listed here are the mixers and social gatherings I plan to attend. Those events generally produce the most selfies with friends. As always, I look forward to these screenings. But moreover, I’m very excited to be reunited with my TCM family! Hope to see you there…

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Here are more top picks from fellow TCMFF friends:

Angela over at The Hollywood Revue: https://hollywoodrevue.wordpress.com/2019/03/23/my-choices-for-tcmff-2019/

Aurora aka @CitizenScreen of Once Upon A Screen: https://aurorasginjoint.com/2019/03/24/my-picks-for-tcmff-2019/ 

Chris Sturhann of Blog of the Darned: https://chrissturhann.blogspot.com/2019/03/tcmff-madness-baby-2019.html 

Danny of Pre-Code.Com: http://pre-code.com/tcmff-2019-full-schedule-posted-and-where-youll-find-me/

Diana of the Flickin’ Out Blog: https://flickinoutblog.com/2019/03/29/dim-the-house-lights-my-picks-for-the-2019-tcm-classic-film-festival/

Em of The Vintage Cameo: http://www.thevintagecameo.com/2019/03/tcmff-2019-schedule-picks/

Jay Patrick of Thirty Hertz Rumble: https://thirtyhertzrumble.com/high-fiving-2019-tcm-film-festival-preview/ 

Joel of Joel’s Classic Film Passion: https://joelrwilliams1.blogspot.com/2019/03/2019-tcm-classic-film-festival.html 

Julia Ricci of Cinema Crossroads: https://cinemacrossroads.wordpress.com/2019/03/24/my-picks-for-the-10th-annual-tcm-classic-film-festival/

Keisha of Cinema Cities: https://cinemacities.wordpress.com/2019/03/26/my-picks-for-tcmff-2019/ 

Lara of Backlots: https://backlots.net/2019/04/02/laras-2019-tcm-classic-film-festival-schedule/ 

Laura of Laura’s Miscellaneous Musings: http://laurasmiscmusings.blogspot.com/2019/03/the-2019-tcm-classic-film-festival.html 

Nikki of The Way We Watch: https://www.thewaywewatch.net/blog-1/2019/3/24/its-here-my-our-tentative-tcmff-2019-schedule

Samantha of Musings of a Classic Film Addict: https://musingsofaclassicfilmaddict.com/2019/03/22/my-picks-for-the-2019-tcm-classic-film-festival/

StanfordClark of Movies Past and Present: http://moviespastandpresent.com/current-plan-for-the-2019-tcm-classic-film-festival/

Ray Harryhausen Film Notes: MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (1949)

 

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The following are my notes as I presented to my Film Study course, Ray Harryhausen. In this week’s class we discussed the big ape that continues to capture our hearts, sixteen years after the famous Pre-Code ape that started it all. Mighty Joe Young.

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Ray Harryhausen with one of his “Joe” models.

For this week, we will explore Ray Harryhausen’s first feature, MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (1949). While not his first solo feature, he served as lead special effects tech under the guidance of his mentor, Willis H O’Brien. (Note the full list of special effects team as mentioned below.) As discussed before, O’Brien’s work in stop-motion animation in KING KONG (1933) is what inspired Harryhausen his life’s work. This is where it all began for both O’Brien and Harryhausen.

THE APE THAT STARTED IT ALL…

The sequel to KING KONG (1933) was released less than 8 months later with SON OF KONG (1933). Robert Armstrong, who portrays Carl Denham the film director/ promoter in the original Kong, reprises his role in the sequel. We then see this same actor play essentially the same type of role with a new name, Max O’Hara. Instead of Denham traveling to Skull Island via the Indian ocean as in KING KONG and SON OF KONG, O’Hara travels to Africa to collect lions for his big night club act. This is where he meets a large and unusual gorilla.

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While most scenes were shot on set at the RKO lot (Paramount), the baby gorilla images were not taken at a zoo, but rather a film crew was sent to Africa.

Jill Young (Terry Moore) has raised this gorilla since “Joe” was an orphaned baby. Jill traded her toys for Joe and nursed him with love. When O’Hara and his safari pal Gregg (Ben Johnson in his first on-screen role) bring Jill and Joe to Hollywood to star as main attractions at O’Hara’s African-themed club. Over time, it becomes clear that Joe and Jill are unhappy and the race to escape from authorities and back home to Africa begins.

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Producer Merian C Cooper with KING KONG (1933)

LOOKS FAMILIAR?

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG is in essence a sister story to KING KONG. This film was also distributed by RKO and produced by the same creative team with a very similar plot. The differences however, are more family-friendly than in the Pre-Code KING KONG. Both films present an odd love triangle of a young woman, a young man, and a large gorilla. Both stories travel deep into the safari jungle, then discover more painful exploitation in their rags to riches adventure in the bright lights of the big city.

KONG vs JOE:

On a size scale, Joe is quite large (supposedly 12 feet tall and 2,000 lbs.) but dwarfs in comparison to Kong. In contrast, Kong was much taller. Creator Merian C Cooper originally envisioned Kong as being 40 to 50 feet tall. However, animator O’Brien built the sets and models scaling Kong to be only 18 feet tall on Skull Island then rescaled him to be 24 feet in New York. Someone had a big growth spurt in the Big Apple!

Unlike many of the mega creatures and characters Harryhausen would work later on, there are no atomic age threats, nor Greek gods at cause for these gorillas of freakishly gigantic growth patterns. What caused both Kong and Joe to reach such bizarre heights is not really explored in either film. Although in the case of Skull Island, including dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures running amuck, the implication is that of a protected bubble out of step from the rest of the world’s evolutionary pace.

There are other striking differences between these two apes that go beyond size. You could say that Kong came from a dysfunctional upbringing in the mean, Darwinian jungles of a dark, violent world yet despite his tough exterior, there’s a softer side that only weakens around blond actresses. Joe, on the other hand, was raised in a loving and nurturing environment. Even Joe’s jungles appear friendly, happy and always with an undercurrent of light whimsy.

Kong is prone to rage, expressing violence and pain frequently. He only becomes gentle upon his rare interactions with his delicate beauty. He protects her at all costs like an obsessive lover. His tragic ending is almost a relief to an otherwise painful and doomed life.

Joe was lovingly raised by his beauty. Their relationship is vastly different from Kong and Ann Darrow’s. Joe is more akin to Jill’s well-trained dog. He is expressive, curious and intelligent but also protective. His life is a charmed one until his trip to Tinsel Town. There, he faces humiliation and disrespect despite his talents and kind demeanor. He always shows loyalty and gentleness with Jill. When the time becomes obvious for Jill to escape the big city to retreat back to their African homestead, we are hopeful they will make it.

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HEART and HUMOR:

Instead of a focus on action, tragedy and pain as in Kong’s doomed fate, Joe’s tale is sprinkled with light moments which are both heartfelt and funny. Examples…

While our introduction to ‘grown Joe’ is mostly action, including impressive scenes mixing live action of lions and men on horses, there are also sweet touches with Joe being scolded by Jill. This also includes Jill being picked up by Joe from above by hand. This is where we see Ray Harryhausen’s brilliance at work. The skills are superior in not only in blending the live action with the Joe model, plus also foregrounds and backgrounds seamlessly as possible. Additionally, note Joe’s facial expressions. Joe listens to Jill, but reluctantly. He picks her up gently. She trusts him implicitly. But like a child walking away with his mother after being scolded in front of others after a fight, Joe turns back to give a few threatening gestures behind her back to let the men know he could’ve won the fight if mom hadn’t come along to save their day. It’s a much lighter human touch than we see in Kong’s treatment.

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Joe was not the only stop-motion animated creature. Lions got into the act, too. 

Another example that is both humorous and heartwarming occurs after Jill and Joe premiere in Hollywood. The dialogue from The Golden Safari club attendees as they give feedback on the club’s ambiance and the lions behind the bar are terrific. Note the familiar faces of many character actors such as Charles Lane. The tug-of-war scene is especially funny- from the intros of strong men with women cat-calling from the audience to the competition itself as Joe toys with them. Again, notice how Joe initiates with kindness and only becomes frustrated if provoked. Ray often brings humanity to his creatures.

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Terry Moore takes a break with the strong men from the humorous tug-of-war scene. 

By the 17th week, Joe is literally being treated like a trained monkey. In an organ grinder routine, both Joe and Jill are humiliated and abused as targets on stage. When a few mean drunks sneak backstage and pour alcohol into Joe, the real mayhem begins when one of the jerks hurts Joe. Even in these small scenes, watch the detailed expressions and movements of Joe. Both expressive and realistically reflective of what we would imagine an ape might do in that drunk-meets-rage unfolding. Just as impressive are the sets being destroyed in stop-motion animation while humans and lions running about.

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The orphanage scene is an especially tense and heart-wrenching climax. There are many technical aspects to the scene that make it both challenging and unforgettable. The use of color tone, fire, set design, and special effects within live action added more layers to the suspense. You can see live action, animation, technical assets of set design, backdrop paintings, and stop-motion animation all beautifully orchestrated in this rescue scene.

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The color tinting adds to this nail-biting climax. 

Ray Harryhausen is said to be responsible for 80 – 90% of the stop-motion animation in MIGHTY JOE YOUNG, with the focus on the Joe model. As his first feature, we can already witness the mastery of his skills and yet this was only the beginning.

Trivia:

-Baby gorilla scenes were not shot in a zoo, they sent a camera crew to Africa.

-Most scenes were shot in Culver City on the Selznick lot (RKO).

-The early scene of lions in cages were shot at the lion farm in Tarzana.

-Ruth Rose’s inspiration for the Max O’Hara character was largely based on the director, Ernest “Monty” Schoedsack, who at 6.6 tall was a larger than life character in real life and was nearly blind (directed by sound and his asst. director). Ruth Rose was his wife.

-Of the 4 large Mighty Joe Young models, one was owned by Schoedsack and promised to Terry Moore upon his death but a maid stole it, another is Moving Image museum. An armature (not fully covered) is owned by Bob Burns.

-Ben Johnson was a real cowboy who wrangled horses in the Howard Hughes film THE OUTLAW (1943) before switching to acting in front of the camera. John Ford discovered him.

-The actual model for Joe was about 13 inches tall (smaller than Kong’s model.)

-Notable character actors: Ellen Corby (known best from The Waltons), William Schallert as the gas station attendant, Jack Pennick (familiar John Ford extra) as truckdriver of the stolen truck, and Irene Ryan (Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies).

– When Joe smashes through set at the night club, the first scream you hear is that of Fay Wray, stock audio from the original KING KONG (1933).

– All of the special effects sequences alone took 14 months to complete.

-The night club set was based on The Cocoanut Grove,” an LA club at the famed Ambassador Hotel.

-The early cowboys scene in Africa used footage originally shot to be used in a planned but not completed follow-up to KING KONG, (“The Valley of Gwangi”). In 1969, that film was eventually completed however by Ray Harryhausen.

-A sequel to MIGHTY JOE YOUNG was planned, “JOE MEETS TARZAN” to star Lex Barker [who starred as Tarzan in TARZAN AND THE SLAVE GIRL (1950)], but was canceled.

MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (1949)

Produced by: Merian C Cooper and John Ford

Director: Ernest B Schoedsack

Original Story: Merian C Cooper

Screenplay: Ruth Rose

Cast (main players):

Terry Moore … Jill Young

Ben Johnson … Gregg

Robert Armstrong … Max O’Hara

Mr. Joseph Young … himself

Frank McHugh … Windy

Douglas Fowley … Jones

Denis Green … Crawford

Paul Guilfoyle … Smith

Nestor Palva … Brown

Regis Toomey … John Young

Lora Lee Michel … Jill Young as a young girl

James Flavin … Schultz

Musical score: Roy Webb

Dir of Photography: J Roy Hunt

Special Effects:

Marcel Delgado … technical staff

Fitch Fulton … technical staff

Ray Harryhausen … first technician

George Lofgren … technical staff

Willis H O’Brien … technical creator

Pete Peterson … second technician

Visual Effects:

Linwood G Dunn … optical photography

Harold E Stine … photographic effects

Bert Willis … photographic effects

Harry Cunningham … model armature construction

Ray Harryhausen … technician

Jack Shaw … matte artist

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*See you next week as we take a journey with 20 MILLION MILES TO EARTH!

The Ray Harryhausen Film Study

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For a couple of years now, I’ve been teaching a series of classic film courses. Film Noir, Screwball Comedy, and Hitchcock are some of the topics we’ve tackled. Starting this week, we’re kicking off with a new adventure into a fantasy world of mythical creatures and monsters. A cinematic dream world created by Ray Harryhausen.

Harryhausen was so enthralled by the wonder of a stop-motion animated ape, created by Willis H O’Brien in KING KONG (1933) as a 13 year-old boy, it changed his life forever. Over the decades that followed, he obsessively and masterfully perfected the art of stop-motion animation, including a process he called “DynaMation.”

Most of the films where he served as the Special Effects creator and director, were more known for his work than the lead actors or director. This remains true to this day of his films. And yet how many Special Effects people can you name, and know so readily by their work like his?

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His craft often required months of long hours and solitary commitments for what would result in a few minutes on screen. His work ethic was exhausting to even consider. For this reason and the sheer brilliance of his artistry, and the timing of what is now a lost art, he stands alone in his legacy. Ray worked with greats like Ray Bradbury and Ted Geisel (Dr. Suess), and his work then inspired legendary filmmakers such as George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, JJ Abrams, Peter Jackson, and countless others.

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In our class, I will present Ray Harryhausen’s background history, the influences and influencers, but mostly we will discuss his filmography together. We’ll explore his Mother Goose Fairy Tales (1946), his contributions to MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (1949), his other monster and alien creations in SciFi classics such as IT CAME FROM BENEATH THE SEA (1955), EARTH vs THE FLYING SAUCERS (1956) and 20 MILLION MILES TO EARTH (1957). Then we’ll transition to the fantasy, mythical, and sometimes prehistoric worlds found in his Sinbad films, MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (1961), JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS (1963), and finally CLASH OF THE TITANS (1981).

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I look forward to enjoying these films through this deeper exploration in a shared experience. If you live in the Lawrence, Kansas area, please join us!

31 Days of Oscar 2019 – Day 3

And now for Day Three in our #31DaysOfOscar Blogathon, hosted by the amazing and lovely co-host Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club…

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While this year’s Academy Awards ceremony is officially host-less, the 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon has three! Kellee of Outspoken & Freckled, Aurora of Once Upon A Screen, and I, here at Paula’s Cinema Club have been celebrating the Oscars themselves and TCM”s tribute to same for the past seven years!

It’s almost a wrap on the third and final day, as I continue to collect the knowledge and opinions of our astute bloggers:

First up, Amanda at Old Hollywood Films focuses on Five Times the Academy Got It Right. Her picks include one of my favorites, George Sanders’ win for All About Eve; click for the rest.

Linda at Backstory: New Looks at Classic Films examines the life and career of “strikingly successful art director” Ward Ihnen.

Pale Writer analyzes Nat King Cole’s Best Song win for “Mona Lisa.”

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Day Two: #31DaysOfOscar Blogathon

I passed the baton for DAY TWO of the #31DaysOfOscar Blogathon to fellow and phenomenal co-host Aurora of Once Upon A Screen…

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I’m happy to say that we approach the halfway mark of this year’s 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon without incident or controversy. As is the case with my co-hosts, I will not be hosting any posts during commercials today, my day to host this year’s event. To put you at ease here is a 1957 Oldsmobile commercial, which aired during the Academy Awards ceremony that year. I will watch it with you thereby pausing my hosting duties.

Welcome back. Before we get to today’s list of entries, you might want to visit the Announcement post, which includes the entire participant roster. Also, be sure to visit Kellee at Outspoken & Freckled and the Day One submissions. Terrific stuff there. Otherwise, I’m getting to the main course of this entry, the tributes to the movies and the people who have had relationships with Oscar…or should have had. Enjoy!

  • We begin…

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Day One: The #31DaysOfOscar Blogathon!

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We have finally arrived to our exciting annual event, The 31 DAYS OF OSCAR BLOGATHON. In tribute and in namesake of the Turner Classic Movies network month-long programming, we honor all things Oscar related by inviting bloggers to contribute. Today, for the first day in our 3-day event, I will be your host and here are your entries… Enjoy!

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1) Our own co-host Aurora (@CitizenScreen) of Once Upon A Screen interviews Kimberly Truhler (@GlamAmor) of GlamAmor.com. Fashion and Film historian Kimberly was recently featured in the CNN docu-series American Style and discussed “FASHION HISTORY, HOLLYWOOD, and the OSCARS” with Aurora…

Interview: Kimberly Truhler on Fashion History, Hollywood, and the Oscars

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2) Paddy (@CaftanWoman) of Caftan Woman presents her entry with the extremely talented and highly influential man of Hollywood, “IRVING BERLIN at the OSCARS.” 

https://www.caftanwoman.com/2019/02/31-days-of-oscar-blogathon-irving.html

3) Sharleen of Clara’s Closet offers up her thoughts on some of Oscar Snubs in “GONE WITH THE WIN.”

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4) The Gal Herself of One’s Gal’s Musings breaks down the impressive stats and Oscar noms of a legend who spent a lifetime on screen, “NATALIE WOOD: Nominated Three Times by Age 25.”  

https://onegalsmusings.blogspot.com/2019/02/31-days-of-oscar-blogathon-tha-actors.html

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5) RealWeegieMidget Reviews (@realweegiemidge) chimes in with “5 OSCAR SUPPORTING NOMINATED ACTORS SINGING UP A STORM.”  

https://weegiemidget.wordpress.com/music/best-singing-supporting-actors/

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6) Daniel (@dsl89 ) of Movie Mania Madness takes a look at the winner of the Best Original Song Score Oscar of the 43rd Academy Awards with the Beatles’ “LET IT BE: IT DON’T COME EASY.”

https://moviemaniamadness.wordpress.com/2019/02/22/31-days-of-oscar-blogathon-let-it-be-the-beatles/


Thank you for reading these wonderful entries in our first day of #31DaysOfOscar Blogathon! But wait… there’s more to come! We have a full weekend yet to come. My co-hosts, Aurora and Paula will take over the hosting for more fascinating Oscar worthy topics…

DAY 2, Saturday 2/23: Host-> Aurora @CitizenScreen/ ONCE UPON A SCREEN

DAY 3, Sunday 2/24: Host -> and Paula/ @Paula_Guthat/ PAULA’S CINEMA CLUB

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Announcement: 31 Days Of Oscar Blogathon 2019

Announcement: 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon 2019

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From the time Douglas Fairbanks, then President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, hosted the first Awards dinner party for about 250 people on May 16, 1929, to this year’s host-free Oscars ceremony ninety years later, this iconic celebration honoring Hollywood’s finest continues to be just as spectacular and riddled with excellence and contentions as the films and filmmakers they honor.

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If you take a look back at the many Oscar moments in these past 90 years of Oscars ceremonies, you’ll find numerous surprises, disappointments and controversies, which continue to spark debate to this day. That’s where we come in. For the seventh consecutive year, I am joining forces with Aurora of Once Upon A Screen aka @CitizenScreen and Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club aka @Paula_Guthat to bring you the 31 Days of Oscar Blogathon. We hope you’ll consider joining us to make this the best and brightest Oscar blogging event yet.

Not surprising, this blogging event is inspired by Turner Classic Movies’ 31 Days of Oscar marathon, which begins its 24th installment on February 1 and ends March 3rd. This year the network presents the film schedule in a mixed topics potpourri surrounding the historic film industry. Topics range from “Grittiest Streets of New York” to “Favorite Singing Cowboys” to “Favorite Epic Soap Opera.” As the Oscars themselves, there’s something for everyone. See the full schedule here: http://prod-images.tcm.com/Microsites/31Days/31Days2019-Schedule.pdf

Since both TCM and the Oscars bring to mind our beloved host and favorite historian, Robert Osborne, we thought we would kick off our Blogathon with his words about the 31 Days of Oscar marathon…

“One thing seems to stir the souls of our Turner Classic Movie loyalists like no other: the 31 Days of Oscar salute.” 

Blogathon Details

This year, we will host all the contributing entries the weekend of the Oscars. That is from Friday, February 22nd through Sunday, February 24th, wrapping up just in the nick of time to watch the Oscars ceremony. We’re also combining all topics this year and simply presenting them over the three days. Any Oscar-related topic is fair game. We are not limiting this event to classic film fare as we’d like to see entries covering the entire span of 9 decades history of Oscar, including this year’s nominees. To help get you motivated, here are categories we have used in the past…

  • The Actors
  • The Directors
  • The Motion Pictures
  • Oscar Snubs
  • The Crafts (music, costumes, etc.)
  • New Idea – Oscar Controversies

Most of you know the drill, but as a reminder, adhering to the following is necessary:

  • Let us know what your desired topic is by leaving a comment on any of the host blogs
  • Include the title and link to your blog in the comments area
  • Advise if you have a date preference – Friday 2/22, Saturday 2/23 or Sunday 2/24
  • Include the event banner on your blog and in the entry post to help us promote the event

Restrictions – just two:

  • Please do not submit previously published posts
  • No duplicates will be accepted to ensure we cover as much of Oscar history as possible

We look forward to hearing from you and to reading your entries. As many entries as you want, actually, so get to it!

Until then here’s to Oscar, to TCM and to YOU! Happy Blogging!

Participating Blogs and Topics:

Caftan Woman… Irving Berlin at the Oscars

Once Upon A Screen… Interview with Kimberly Truhler- Fashion and Oscar

The Stop Button… Eleanor Parker: Oscar Nominee

Movie Night’s Group… Peter O’Toole in My Favorite Year

The Old Hollywood Garden… Best Supporting Actress of 1952 (1953 Oscars ceremony)

Outspoken & Freckled… Bizarre and Beautiful at the Biltmore: the 7th Academy Awards

 

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