A Dog, a Dinosaur Bone, and a Delinquent… Go to the Beach with BACHELOR FLAT (1962)

After an unusually cold April, May suddenly feels more like a scorching July and makes me yearn for the beach. Or, classic beach movies. When I nostalgically recall of summers of my youth, silly sex comedies of the 60s often filled my days. I wasn’t old enough to see them first-run so my screenings were likely a decade or two later, running in syndication on television. Squeezed in amongst the carefree flicks of Annette and Frankie and Elvis, I have fond memories of Frank Tashlin’s BACHELOR FLAT (1962).

The story is simple enough and whips along with chaotic energy, driven by the basic premise of mistaken identity… and sex. Starring Tuesday Weld, Richard Beymer, Terry-Thomas, and Celeste Holm, BACHELOR FLAT offered a popular cast. Terry-Thomas portrays British professor Bruce Patterson, a highly-disciplined and mild-mannered college professor who seeks the calm, simple life: digging up dinosaur bones, the serenity of his beach house, and the love of his fashion designer fiancee, Helen Bushmill (portrayed by Celeste Holm). Problems arise when this (until recently) lifelong, shy bachelor is hounded by sex-starved women; many are his students, who find his old school British accent and stoicism more than just charming- also challenging and irresistible. The professor rents his beach house from Helen while she’s out of the country, building her international fashion career. Helen also rents her parking pad adjacent to her beach house to law school student Mike Pulaski (Richard Beymer), who lives in his modest camper with his cute dachsund dog, “Jessica.” Trouble brews again when a seventeen year old girl named “Libby” (Tuesday Weld) shows up, who claims to be a street-wise teenager delinquent on the lam from the law. She manages to charm both bachelors Bruce and Mike before her true identity is revealed. Even sweet “Jessica” finds trouble in a way that echoes a famous dog (Skippy) character, “George” from BRINGING UP BABY (1938).

At the time of filming, Tuesday Weld was eighteen years old yet had been acting since early childhood- a childhood where she was expected to be the bread winner and grew up fast. Very fast. By the time she turned a mere twelve years old, she had already spent the last 2 years battling heavy drinking, love affairs, a nervous breakdown, and a suicide attempt. Her ability to play a teen role for many years, coupled with her acting skills and professionalism, kept her in high demand. Weld’s private life was about as famous as the roles she turned down, including: LOLITA (1962), BONNIE AND CLYDE (1967), TRUE GRIT (1969), CACTUS FLOWER (1969). In this film, she seems much older than her character’s high school senior status, even though she’s playing someone her own age. Not surprising.

Not even 2 months after wrapping up his role as “Tony” on WEST SIDE STORY (he was nominated for a Golden Globe for this performance, Best Actor, Comedy or Musical), Richard Beymer began production on this light comedy, filmed over at 20th Century Fox studios and on location along the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. No doubt this young actor was a hot ticket and on the rise to stardom. He was nominated in 1962 for another Golden Globe for “Most Promising Newcomer, Male” and a Golden Laurel award for “Top Male New Personality.” He continued to work, mostly in television, including his iconic return to the David Lynch famed “Twin Peaks” series (1989 – 1991, 2017). Beymer discovered his creativity exceeded beyond acting and pursued writing, cinematography, and filmmaking documentaries.

British born Terry-Thomas was an actor who found international appeal and fame. Born Thomas Terry Hoar-Stevens, he chose the stage name Terry Thomas when he tried his hand at theater after a long string of vocations that failed to pan out. He later added the hyphen, which he felt represented his signature gap between his teeth. With his trademark looks and catchphrases (“jolly good show”), Thomas was equally popular in films on this side of the pond. By the 1960s, he became a beloved actor in meatier character roles, often with a low-brow comedy edge, such as: IT’S A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD (1963), HOW TO MURDER YOUR WIFE (1965), THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES… (1965), HOW SWEET IT IS! (1968). Thomas was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 1971. He tried to pick up parts here and there in the 1970s and 1980s, but it grew more difficult to act as the disease progressed. He became nearly destitute financially, selling off his estate, living in a meager flat with growing medical costs and unable to work. Friends and fellow actors created a fundraiser on his behalf so he could live out his days in dignity. He died in 1990 at the age of 78 years old.

Celeste Holm was a successful and prolific actress across stage, television, and film. She gave strong performances early in her film career including GENTLEMAN’S AGREEMENT, 1947 (she won both an Academy Award and a Golden Globe for her performance as Best Actress in a Supporting Role), THE SNAKE PIT, 1948, COME TO THE STABLE, 1949 (she was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Actress in a Supporting Role), ALL ABOUT EVE, 1950 (again nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role). Starting early in the 1950s, Holm transitioned to mostly television roles for the rest of her career, which continued right up until her final year. She passed away at age 95 in 2012, after working over a hundred acting credits.

Holm was a popular actress with a highly likable screen persona but somehow got stuck always playing second fiddle to the lead. Ya know, that Eve Arden type who was a gal’s best pal who would repeatedly play the bridesmaid, but never the bride. (In regards to both Holm and Arden, I’d say I’m dumbfounded as to why these first-rate actors could ever be considered second bananas.) Interestingly, Celeste Holm is finally the bride in BACHELOR FLAT, although we never quite make it to the wedding. It’s disappointing we don’t see more of Holm in this picture, as we do the other main cast. I would blame the youth-focused 60s for pushing the Weld and Beymer romance more, but Thomas gets a lion’s share of screen time in comparison. Then again, he’s being chased by bikini-clad young women (who also look too old to be in school) so that may explain his more generous screen time.

Director Tashlin was ready for a rom-com in familiar waters. He began his directing career with animated Looney Tune features in the 1930s and 1940s. With a strong instinct for slapstick and physical comedy, Tashlin transitioned to feature films, directing films starring powerhouses such as Bob Hope, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, Jayne Mansfield, and Doris Day.

Fascinating trivia. What do Marilyn Monroe and Debbie Reynolds have in common with this film? There’s a little mystery surrounding a dress worn by Roxanne Arlen as “Mrs. Roberts,” a neighbor. At first sight it is clearly a copy of one of the most famous dresses in fashion in film history, the ‘subway dress’ worn by Marilyn Monroe in THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH. But could it be the actual Marilyn dress designed by Travilla, which was later auctioned as part of the Debbie Reynolds collection? Was it loaned out by the studio for this film and altered to fit this actress? Many rumors and speculations have circled over the decades to this mystery. This article from The Marilyn Monroe Collection site breaks down the details. What do you think?

Is this the real deal- or a knock-off?

I believe 60s sex comedies are highly misunderstood. They’ve been given a bad rap as too silly and misogynistic. But I contend these films like BACHELOR FLAT are actually a parody of sexism and rooted in a deep history of physical comedy with nods to slapstick and screwball comedy. And who doesn’t long for the nostalgia of the summer flicks of our youth?

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This piece on Frank Tashlin’s BACHELOR FLAT (1961) is my contribution to the CMBA (Classic Movie Blog Association) Spring Blogathon. I am a proud member of this group of talented writers. Please explore the other bloggers’ submissions for this year’s “Fun in the Sun” theme.

BREAKING NEWS! The 10th anniversary of WHAT A CHARACTER! Blogathon is here!

It all began with Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and an interstitial series of dedications the network has aired honoring character actors. You have no doubt seen them, video tributes to Edna May OliverBeulah BondiWilliam DemarestButterfly McQueen, and many other supporting players whose work stands the test of time. With these tributes WHAT A CHARACTER! was born and, unable to resist those actors, Paula, Aurora and I decided to dedicate a blogging event in their honor. Now, for the tenth consecutive year, we continue the tradition.

Aurora of Once Upon a Screen and @CitizenScreen,  Paula of Paula’s Cinema Club and @Paula_Guthat, and yours truly Kellee of Outspoken & Freckled and @Irishjayhawk66, would like to extend this invitation to the 2021 WHAT A CHARACTER! Blogathon to all bloggers who appreciate the laughter, the good taste, the double takes, the heart, and the comfort all the character actors have brought us through the years.

This entry also serves as a heartfelt thank you to all who have participated in this event so graciously for nine years. The talent, enthusiasm, and passion with which you have approached our beloved character actors are beyond anything we could have imagined. We hope you join us again for this special celebration.

The WHAT A CHARACTER! Blogathon

When: Saturday, December 4
How:
  • Let the hosts know which character actor you choose by leaving a comment below
    • We prefer no repeats and character actors can be from any era of film or television
  • Please include the name and URL of your blog and your Twitter handle to help us promote your work properly
  • Publish your post on or before December 4
  • Include the event banner courtesy of Paula Guthat on your blog to help us promote this special event
  • HAVE FUN and spread the word!

Giveaways!

A tenth anniversary is a big deal, a fact recognized by Turner Classic Movies and The University Press of Kentucky who have offered books to give away to 10 lucky U.S. and Canada participants of the WHAT A CHACRACTER! Blogathon.

From the TCM Library, we have 5 copies of The Essentials: 52 Must-See Movies and Why They Matter by Jeremy Arnold with foreword by Robert Osborne. A big thank you to Justin Gottlieb, Entertainment Marketing, Social Media Manager at Turner Classic Movies for securing these books for us.

While you may well be familiar with TCM, you may not know about The University Press of Kentucky, which has a wonderful array of film history-related biographies and analytical studies in its Screen Classics series. For our event, Director of Sales & Marketing, Brooke Raby has offered a sampling of their offerings, one copy of each of the following titles:

Charles Boyer: The French Lover by John Baxter

Natalie Wood: A Life by Gavin Lambert

Otto Preminger: The Man Who Would Be King by Foster Hirsch

Cecil B. DeMille’s Hollywood by Robert S. Birchard

Radical Innocence: A Critical Study of the Hollywood Ten by Bernard F. Dick

Thank you to Raby Brooke for the terrific list of books.

Before we get to blogging with character, I want to express my appreciation and a hearty congratulations to my friends and co-hosts, Aurora and Paula. One decade down: forever to go. Happy WHAT A CHARACTER! Anniversary!

Chosen Actors & Participating Blogs

Cloris Leachman – Outspoken & Freckled

Hans Conried – A Shroud of Thoughts

Wally Cox – Journeys in Classic Film

Mildred Dunnock and Patricia Collinge – The Last Drive In

Hope Emerson – Shadows and Satin

Valerie Perrine – Real Weegie Midget Reviews

Felix Bressart – Taking Up Room

Jack Carson – Second Sight Cinema

Theresa Harris – Blog of the Darned

George Tobias – A Person in the Dark

Kathleen Harrison – Caftan Woman

Lucille La Verne – The Classic Movie Muse

Elisha Cook, Jr. – Whimsically Classic

Conrad Veidt – Lady Eve’s Reel Life

William Frawley – By Rich Watson

Doro Merande – Trivial History

Edward Everett Horton – Silent Film Music

Eugene Pallette – Top 10 Film Lists

Lillian Randolph – Another Old Movie Blog

Film Class: SUNSET BOULEVARD (1950)

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I teach a series of classic film classes in my town. Currently, I’m instructing my second Film Noir course. Each course is structured similar to a Book Club but with my guiding contributions of background, trivia, history, influencers, and more. The first class is my overview on the style/genre plus the outline of films we’ll review each week. The participants watch the assigned film at home, then we screen selected clips and engage in discussions in class. In the 2nd week we screened Billy Wilder’s timeless classic noir, SUNSET BOULEVARD (1950) and I thought I’d share my notes with you…

Basic Info:

Director: Billy Wilder

Writing Credits: Charles Brackett (also the Producer), Billy Wilder, DM Marshman Jr

Music: Franz Waxman

Dir of Photography: John F Seitz

Costumes: Edith Head

Starring: Gloria Swanson, William Holden, Eric von Stroheim, Nancy Olson…

Cameos: Cecil B deMille, Buster Keaton, HB Warner, Hedda Hopper, Anna Q. Nilsson

Notes:

The original opening scene, depicting corpses including a toe-tagged Bill Holden in a morgue chatting, was cut. Test audiences roared with laughter- was meant to be subtle dark humor, not slapstick camp. Switched to striking pool scene. Special difficulties loomed in filming to get this opening shot right- water exactly 40 degrees, shot from above with mirror below.

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The famous “Phantom Mansion” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_O._Jenkins_House) – exterior was a real house on Wilshire Blvd, owned by J Paul Getty, originally built by robber baron William O Jenkins. Both Jenkins and Getty families had a knack for acquiring wealth and ignored the estate as much as they did their own families. It sat empty for many years, while occupying a full block as the source of many neighbors’ frustrations by the time Wilder used it for this film. An outdoor pool was dug/created for key scenes and later emptied- this was later used in “Rebel Without A Cause.” The lonely mansion was torn down. A modern-styled building, the Tidewater Oil Co., exists there now. Rest of it was shot on a studio set.

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Wilder was very EXACT and super detailed in his directing approach. As a writer himself, no one was allowed to deviate from the script. He and Charlie Brackett were notoriously talented as a team, yet didn’t actually like each other and were even sarcastically called, “the happiest couple in Hollywood.” Masters of both Screwball Comedy and Film Noir, the end results were cinematic gold. His family was murdered in the Holocaust. Wilder brought his biting, dark humor from Europe with him and it can be seen in all of his films.

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When asked why Billy enjoyed the use of voice-over narration so much (we see in SUNSET BLVD but also in his other films and a common technique in other noirs), he said: 1) It does an excellent job of catching the audience up to speed quickly and 2) It allows a writer like himself to express clever plays on words.

ALL the Norma Desmonds:

Various ‘aging Hollywood starlets’ were considered, approached and/or test-screened to play Norma Desmond… Mae West (she wanted to rewrite dialogue so that was an automatic no), Pola Negri (too strong of a Polish accent), Mary Pickford (she insisted on owning her own negatives as she had with all of her films, plus she feared the role may come across as demeaning and mocking of legendary silent stars such as herself, so she was a no), then George Cukor suggested Gloria Swanson, who was very similar to Norma Desmond in terms of great popularity during Silent era. She landed up being the absolute perfect actress for the role as she worked hard, nailed the performance into legend, and while she was no Norma, it landed up being a true “comeback for an otherwise has-been” plum role. Swanson was a very fascinating woman in real life, having lived through many rags-to-riches life stories, several times. At this point in her life, she had married and divorced 5 husbands and was a faded star.

Although Norma is supposed to be a fictional character based upon a composite collection of Hollywood stars, some have suggested the ND name may have been inspired by silent star Norma Talmadge –or- a combination of the names of the actress Mabel Normand and director William Desmond Taylor. Normand was a very successful actor/writer/producer/director in the silent era but was frequently connected to scandal. In 1922, Taylor was murdered. Normand was a close friend and the last person known to see him alive but was ruled out as a suspect, after a rough police interrogation. The case has never been solved.

Before William Holden, Montgomery Clift was offered the role. He agreed initially, went off to a ski trip then declined. Almost like Swanson, Holden while working more actively than Gloria, was also in a bit of a career slump (more second fiddle than A lister leads) yet Wilder saw the potential in each of them as much deeper than their prior films had allowed them to fully realize.

Eric von Stroheim– like Swanson, he too possessed striking parallels to his character so made for the ideal “Max. “ He was one of the most famous directors of the silent era. His career suffered when he was more interested in art than commercial success when he made 7 hour long films and gave investors a hard when asked to edit to a standard length (“GREED”) Ironically, when Stroheim directed Swanson in “QUEEN KELLY” a film (that her then lover Joseph Kennedy convinced Gloria to do) it was a bust at the box office and the two had a falling out. Apparently, von Stroheim and Swanson resolved their differences by SUNSET BLVD because there were never any reports of any issues on set.

Nancy Olson– considered perfect for the role. I personally saw her introduce SUNSET BLVD. on the mega screen at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre for TCM Film Fest and she told us lovely stories about Edith Head and mentioned her nickname in school was “Wholesome Olson.”

Here are some of the questions and topics I prepared and posed to the class to prompt discussions:

~In what ways SUNSET BLVD a Film Noir, how does it differ from other ‘typical’ noirs?

~Discuss the themes: duality of a film this is both about the Movie Biz, but also a Film Noir

~The intro sets the tone… of decay, of cynicism, of fated doom.

~While it is a black and white, but it was big budget- how do you think Wilder gave it ‘Noir’ touches stylistically?

~The characters; who do we root for? Who is vulnerable? Do we feel sympathy for them?

~What does this film say about the movies/of Hollywood/ of the studio system/ of screenwriters?

~What double meanings does the writing cleverly reveal?

~Where do we see and who demonstrates disillusionment?

~What examples of symbolism do we see?

~Why do you think it has remained such a timeless classic?

~Why did Joe not see/not choose all the exit signs (would he land up as the next dead monkey, or the next Max?)- was he too as fated for doom as Norma?

~Nancy Olson quotes Billy Wilder that “all the characters in SUNSET BLVD are opportunists”… in what ways does this film show us opportunists and their consequences, and about ‘selling out’?

~What does this film say about aging actresses in that industry back then- and even to this day?

Members of my class had interesting insights and additional commentary to contribute as we watched key scenes. Many debated whether Swanson’s performance was too over-the-top to the level of ‘camp.’ This poses a good question. My two thoughts on the matter for those who thought she was too campy… 1) Did you see Carol Burnett’s parody of Norma Desmond BEFORE seeing the actual film your first time, and could that have subconsciously planted that parody seed of perception? 2) Keep in mind that over-the-top dramatic gestures and mannerisms is inherit to the Norma Desmond character as she lives in her silent film star world, even prior to breaking down completely and detaching from reality at the end.

One student whom had seen this film a few times prior added that it never occurred to her until our discussion that this film was a darker criticism of Hollywood and the movie industry. Another student pondered how much this film was pivotal in turning Bill Holden’s career from a relatively B list actor to much stronger roles post- SUNSET BLVD success. Another student added that Ronald Reagan had similar B list roles until he became political in his aspirations. I joked, “just think, if it wasn’t for SUNSET BLVD, perhaps we would have had a ‘President Holden.’

We discussed, how much sympathy do we have for Norma, especially after Cecil B deMille explains what ‘a dozen press agents working around the clock can do to the ego.’ After all, we see mercurial sides of Norma- often insulting, unyielding, selfish, and brutal, and yet quite lonely and vulnerable. What factors contributed to her delusions and ultimate demise, and why were the other ‘wax figures’ of her contemporaries not affected the same way? One answer could be that her peers may have been forced to adapt because they may not have profited into mega wealth as well as she did. And yet, CB de Mille transitioned successfully from the silent era and remained active in the industry- was being a male director with strong adaption skills (vs. an aging female in front of the camera) key? Was Max to blame for keeping her in her fantasy bubble? Or, were her peers quietly suffering in their own ways yet managed to cope just enough to be functioning? (At least enough to still make it until the next gathering of playing a game of Bridge.)

My final thought for the class was focused on Max, the character portrayed by Eric von Stroheim. Who was the more ‘crazy’ of the two? Norma, for remaining too deeply fastened into her past and the subsequent lack of reality? Or Max, even as her former director and husband, for dysfunctional worshipping her as an indentured servant and enabled her fate? In the end, Max was most likely to be the sole beneficiary of that big estate so maybe he was motivated in his madness.

For me, SUNSET BOULEVARD is easily a nominee for the best film ever made. It’s a blend of so many themes and genres… a film noir, a thriller, a movie about the movie industry, and perhaps even a horror film. In addition to the compelling performances and fascinating story, it is a reflection of the brilliance of Billy Wilder. It remains a haunting, genius piece of storytelling and art, which is why it continues to be a timeless classic, just like Norma Desmond herself.

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Here are some additional resources/other views on this film that I found interesting…

From YouTube:

Sunset Boulevard Explained: The Hollywood Nightmare (ScreenPrism)

https://youtu.be/5gbknao5D-U

 

Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard- a look back (cinematographos)

https://youtu.be/aIp8rK8vG8s

 

From Wilshire Boulevard Houses:

https://wilshireboulevardhouses.blogspot.com/2013/02/641-south-irving-boulevard-please-see.html

 

From Cinematheque, “Strange Magic, The Films of Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder” http://www.thecinematheque.ca/strange-magic-the-films-of-charles-brackett-and-billy-wilder

“One of the most famous comments about the two apparently competing theatrical genres of comedy and tragedy is that “Comedy is simply tragedy plus time.” This remark is often attributed to the great Carol Burnett. It was in fact uttered by Charles Brackett to Billy Wilder in the studio office of a Hollywood executive who was desperately trying to understand their original intention of making Sunset Boulevard as a comedy!”

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